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Oscars of the 1960's - History

Oscars of the 1960's - History


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Year Picture Actor Actress Suporting Actor Suporting Actress Director

1960.....The Apartment (Mirisch Co., United Artists) Lancaster, Burt (Elmer Gantry) Taylor, Elizabeth (Butterfield 8) Ustinov, Peter (Spartacus) Jones., Shirley (Elmer Gantry) Wilder, Billy (The Apartment)

1961......West Side Story (United Artists) Schell, Maximillian (Judgement at Nuremberg) Loren,. Sophia (Two Women) Chakiris, George (West Side Story) Moreno, Rita (West Side Story) Robbins, Jerome; Wise, Robert (West Side Story)

1962......Lawrence of Arabia (Columbia) Peck, Gregory (To Kill a Mockingbird) Bancroft, Anne (The Miracle Worker) Begley, Ed (Sweet Bird of Youth) Duke, Patty (The Miracle Worker) Lean, David (Lawrence of Arabia)

1963..... Tom Jones (Woodfall Prod., United Artists-Lopert Pictures) Poitier, Sidney (Lilies of the Field) Neal, Patricia (Hud) Douglas, Melvyn (Hud) Rutherford, Margaret (The V.I.P.'s) Richardson, Tony (Tom Jones) Tom Jones (Woodfall Prod., United Artists-Lopert Pictures)

1964.....My Fair Lady (Warner Bros.) Harrison, Rex (My Fair Lady) Andrews, Julie (Mary Poppins) Ustinov, Peter (Topkapi) Kedrova, Lila (Zorba the Greek) Cukor, George (My Fair Lady)

1965.....The Sound of Music (20th Century Fox) Marvin, Lee (Cat Ballou) Christie, Julie (Darling) Balsam, Martin (A Thousand Clowns) Winters, Shelley (A Patch of Blue) Wise, Robert (The Sound of Music)

1966..... A Man for All Seasons (Columbia) Scofield, Paul (A Man for All Seasons) Taylor, Elizabeth (Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf) Matthau, Walter (The Fortune Cookie) Dennis, Sandy (Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf) Zinnemann, Fred (A Man for All Seasons)

1967.....In the Heat of the Night Steiger, Rod (In the Heat of the Night) Hepburn, Katherine (Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?) Kennedy, George (Cool Hand Luke) Parsons, Estelle (Bonnie and Clyde) Nichols, Mike (The Graduate)

1968...... Oliver! Robertson, Cliff (Charly) Hepburn, Katherine (The Lion in Winter) and Streisand, Barbara (Funny Girl) (tie) Albertson (The Subject was Roses) Gordon, Ruth (Rosemary's Baby) Reed, Sir Carol (Oliver!) Oliver!

1969.....Midnight Cowboy Wayne, John (True Grit) Smith, Maggie (The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie) Young, Gig (They Shoot Horses, Don't They?) Hawn, Goldie (Cactus Flower) Schlesinger, John (Midnight Cowboy)

1970.....Patton Scott, George C. (Patton) (award refused) Jackson, Glenda (Women in Love) Mills, John (Ryan's Daughter) Hayes, Helen (Airport) Schaffner (Patton)


"Ben-Hur" wins 11 Academy Awards

Clocking in at three hours and 32 minutes, William Wyler’s Technicolor epic Ben-Hur is the behemoth entry at the 32nd annual Academy Awards ceremony, held on this day in 1960, at the RKO Pantages Theatre in Hollywood. Setting an Oscar record, the film swept 11 of the 12 categories in which it was nominated, including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Actor (Charlton Heston).

Wyler’s 1959 film was the latest dramatic adaptation of the mega-bestselling novel Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ, published in 1880 by Lew Wallace. Wallace, a former general in the American Civil War, wrote his most successful novel after experiencing a new awakening of his Christian faith. The book told the story of a young Jewish aristocrat, Judah Ben Hur, who chafes against the repressive Roman rule in Judea, loses his fortune and his family, but eventually triumphs over obstacles (thanks partially to the intervention of Jesus Christ).

After Wallace’s novel was adopted into a long-running stage play in 1899 and a short film in 1907, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer bought the film rights and produced a major motion-picture version, directed by Cecil B. DeMille, in 1925. After DeMille scored a hit with a remake of his own 1923 biblical epic The Ten Commandments (1956), MGM decided to revive Ben-Hur as well. Wyler had worked on the set of DeMille’s 1925 version and the square-jawed Heston played Moses in The Ten Commandments.

Filmed on location in Italy, on a budget of some $15 million, Ben-Hur was the most expensive movie ever made up to that point. The film’s famous chariot race scene alone took three weeks to shoot and used some 15,000 extras. The setting for the race was constructed on 18 acres of back-lot space at Cinecitta Studios outside Rome. Aside from a few of the most daredevil stunts, Heston and Stephen Boyd (who played Messala, Judah Ben-Hur’s boyhood friend turned bitter enemy) did most of their own chariot driving. The payoff was big: Writing in his review of the film for the New York Times, Bosley Crowther called the scene a “stunning complex of mighty setting, thrilling action by horses and men, panoramic observation and overwhelming dramatic use of sound.”


Oscars of the 1960's - History

1960
The winner is listed first, in CAPITAL letters.

Best Picture

THE APARTMENT (1960)

The Alamo (1960)

Elmer Gantry (1960)

Sons and Lovers (1960, UK)

The Sundowners (1960)

Actor:
BURT LANCASTER in "Elmer Gantry", Trevor Howard in "Sons and Lovers", Jack Lemmon in "The Apartment", Laurence Olivier in "The Entertainer", Spencer Tracy in "Inherit the Wind"
Actress:
ELIZABETH TAYLOR in "Butterfield 8", Greer Garson in "Sunrise at Campobello", Deborah Kerr in "The Sundowners", Shirley MacLaine in "The Apartment", Melina Mercouri in "Never on Sunday"
Supporting Actor:
PETER USTINOV in "Spartacus", Peter Falk in "Murder, Inc.", Jack Kruschen in "The Apartment", Sal Mineo in "Exodus", Chill Wills in "The Alamo"
Supporting Actress:
SHIRLEY JONES in "Elmer Gantry", Glynis Johns in "The Sundowners", Shirley Knight in "The Dark at the Top of the Stairs", Janet Leigh in "Psycho", Mary Ure in "Sons and Lovers"
Director:
BILLY WILDER for "The Apartment", Jack Cardiff for "Sons and Lovers", Jules Dassin for "Never on Sunday", Alfred Hitchcock for "Psycho", Fred Zinnemann for "The Sundowners"

The Best Picture Award winner was director/producer/writer Billy Wilder's cynical and risque black and white comedy/tragi-drama The Apartment (with a total of ten nominations and five wins - Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Writing: Story and Screenplay, Best B/W Art Direction, and Best Film Editing). It was an indictment of corporate politics. It told about an ambitious, lonely insurance clerk (Jack Lemmon) who lends out his NY apartment to higher executives for their clandestine, illicit affairs. His married boss's (Fred MacMurray) girlfriend and elevator operator (Shirley MacLaine) is so depressed about her own involvement that she attempts suicide.

Wilder's Some Like It Hot (1959) was mostly overlooked the previous year, so the Academy made up for the oversight this year. [It was an unprecedented triple win for Wilder - three Oscars for co-writing, producing, and directing the same film. The last time a triple win had occurred was director Leo McCarey's win for Going My Way (1944), but in 1944, the Best Picture award wasn't yet given to individual producers. It would also occur for Francis Ford Coppola in 1974, James L. Brooks in 1983, and James Cameron in 1997.] It was remarkable that none of the three nominated members of the acting cast (Lemmon, MacLaine, or Kruschen) of the Best Picture winner won an Oscar.

The other Best Picture nominees in 1960 were mostly a mixed bag:

  • producer/director/actor John Wayne's overlong, big-budget, turgid American epic about the 1836 battle for independence, The Alamo (with a total of seven nominations and only one win - Best Sound) - Wayne had tirelessly campaigned for the tepid film, suggesting with ads that it would be unpatriotric not to vote for the film - "the most expensive picture ever made on American soil"
  • writer/director Richard Brooks' Elmer Gantry (with five nominations and three wins - Best Actor, Best Supporting Actress, and Best Screenplay) that was based on Sinclair Lewis' expose novel about disreputable and fraudulent small-town evangelists
  • a film adaptation of D. H. Lawrence's autobiographical novel by director Jack Cardiff, Sons and Lovers (with six nominations and one win - Best B/W Cinematography)
  • director Fred Zinnemann's film of an Irish sheep-herding family in Australia during the 1920s from Jon Cleary's novel, The Sundowners (with five nominations and no wins)

The Best Director nominees Alfred Hitchcock (for Psycho - this was the famed director's fifth and last unsuccessful nomination in this category) and Jules Dassin (for Never On Sunday - this was his sole Best Director nomination) replaced Best Picture-nominated directors John Wayne (for The Alamo) and Richard Brooks (for Elmer Gantry) in that category.

Burt Lancaster (with his second nomination and sole Oscar win) won the Best Actor Award for the title role in Elmer Gantry - a 1920s charismatic, phony, silver-tongued, amoral, spellbinding, grinning and womanizing Bible Belt evangelist who becomes attracted to a revivalist (un-nominated Jean Simmons) and her traveling troupe. [This was the only Oscar win for Lancaster out of a total of four career nominations - other nominations were for From Here to Eternity (1953), Birdman of Alcatraz (1962), and Atlantic City (1981).]

Other Best Actor nominees included:

  • Jack Lemmon (with his third of eight career nominations) as lonely, ambitious and young New York insurance clerk C. C. Baxter who loans out his Manhattan apartment for romantic trysts for his company's executive supervisors while falling in love with the elevator girl (Shirley MacLaine) - one of the victims, in The Apartment
  • Laurence Olivier (with his sixth of ten career nominations) as seedy vaudevillian performer Archie Rice in director Tony Richardson's The Entertainer (the film's sole nominaton)
  • Spencer Tracy (with his seventh of nine career nominations) as a "Clarence Darrow-style" trial lawyer named Henry Drummond opposite prosecutor Matthew Harrison Brady (unnominated Fredric March as Biblical literalist William Jennings Bryan) in director Stanley Kramer's fictionalized dramatization of the 1925 Tennessee Scopes "Monkey Trial", Inherit the Wind (with four nominations and no wins)
  • Trevor Howard (with his sole career nomination) as D. H. Lawrence's drunken, coal-mining father Walter Morel in Sons and Lovers

The Best Actress category (with two prostitutes and a mistress among the nominees) was won by Elizabeth Taylor (with her fourth of four consecutive nominations and her first Oscar win) as part-time model and wanton, fast-living, disturbed call-girl Gloria Wandrous caught in a doomed romance with a wealthy married man (Laurence Harvey) and her love for her disapproving friend (Eddie Fisher) in the trashy Daniel Mann film based on John O'Hara's novel, Butterfield 8 (with two nominations and one win - Best Actress). The title of the picture was derived from her answering services' telephone exchange - Butterfield. Violet-eyed Taylor's win for the widely-panned melodramatic film is often interpreted as a sympathy vote because she had lost in the three previous years, and she had just endured an emergency tracheotomy during a near-fatal bout of pneumonia, and had throat scars to prove it.

The defeated Best Actress nominees included well-deserving actresses:

  • Deborah Kerr (with her sixth and last unsuccessful career nomination) for her role as Ida Carmody, a sheepherder in Australia married to Robert Mitchum in director Fred Zinnemann's The Sundowners
  • Greer Garson (with her seventh and final Best Actress career nomination) for her role as Eleanor Roosevelt (opposite unnominated Ralph Bellamy as FDR) in the story of Franklin D. Roosevelt's life and presidency, in director Vincent J. Donahue's Sunrise at Campobello
  • Greek-born Melina Mercouri (with her sole career nomination) as Ilya - an uneducated, fun-loving Greek prostitute in writer/director Jules Dassin's Never on Sunday (with five nominations and one win - Best Song) - Mercouri's first major successful international film
  • Shirley MacLaine (with her second of five career nominations) as Fran Kubelik - the insurance company's depressed, quirky elevator girl who is seduced by Jack Lemmon's married boss Fred MacMurray and subsequently attempts suicide in The Apartment

London-born Peter Ustinov (with his second of three career nominations - and his first of two Oscar wins - he was previously nominated for his supporting role in a similar epic Quo Vadis? (1951) ) won the Best Supporting Actor award as a wily, greedy Roman slave trader-master Lentulus Batiatus who trains Kirk Douglas in a gladiator school in Stanley Kubrick's tale of a slave revolt, Spartacus (with six nominations and four wins - Best Supporting Actor, Best Color Cinematography, Best Color Art Direction/Set Decoration, and Best Color Costume Design).

Other Best Supporting Actor nominees were:

  • Peter Falk (with his first of two unsuccessful career nominations) as Abe Reles - a 1930s hired killer in Murder, Inc. (the film's sole nomination)
  • Jack Kruschen (with his sole nomination) as Dr. Dreyfuss - Jack Lemmon's next-door neighbor who helps save co-star Shirley MacLaine from suicide in The Apartment
  • Sal Mineo (with his second and last unsuccessful career nomination) as Zionist terrorist Dov Landau in director Otto Preminger's version of Leon Uris' best-selling novel Exodus (with three nominations and one win - Best Dramatic Score)
  • Chill Wills (with his sole nomination) as the 'beekeeper' in The Alamo. [Wills might have won, except that he vigorously campaigned for his own nomination - a dubious one at best - and had aggressively hired a publicist for his campaign. He put an ad in the trade papers declaring to all Academy members: "Win, lose, or draw, you're still all my cousins, and I love you," and signed it "Your cousin, Chill Wills." Another of Wills' ads suggested that the film's cast was praying for a Wills victory "harder than the real Texans prayed for their lives at the Alamo." The tactic seemingly backfired.]

The Best Supporting Actress award went to Shirley Jones (with her sole career nomination) and her against-type role as blonde Lulu Bains - Burt Lancaster's former dishevelled girlfriend/turned hustling, blackmailing prostitute who seeks revenge in Elmer Gantry. [She is best known for playing the mother on the TV show The Partridge Family in the early 70s.]

Other Best Supporting Actress competitors included:

  • Janet Leigh (with her sole career nomination) for her role as Marion Crane - a money thief stabbed to death in the Bates Motel in an unforgettable shower scene in director Alfred Hitchcock's celebrated horror film Psycho
  • Glynis Johns (with her sole nomination) as Mrs. Firth - the Cockney, Australian barmaid/innkeeper in The Sundowners
  • Shirley Knight (with her first of two unsuccessful career nomination) as Reenie - a shy 1920s Oklahoman daughter (of salesman Robert Preston) in director Delbert Mann's film of William Inge's screenplay, The Dark at the Top of the Stairs (the film's sole nomination)
  • Mary Ure (with her sole nomination) as sexually-emancipated Clara Dawes in Sons and Lovers

The Honorary Oscar award was awarded to a gravely-ill Gary Cooper this year, "for his many memorable screen performances and the international recognition he, as an individual, has gained for the motion picture industry." He had received five Best Actor nominations in his career from 1936 to 1952, and won two Oscars - Sergeant York (1941) and High Noon (1952). Cooper died a month after the awards ceremony (April 17, 1961), on May 13, 1961. Stan Laurel also received an Honorary award for "his creative pioneering in the field of cinema comedy."

In this year, Hayley Mills was the last recipient of the outstanding juvenile Honorary award (a miniature statuette), for Pollyanna - an honor that first began as a tribute to Shirley Temple in 1934. From now on, child performers would be included among the regular competitive awards. [The first nominated child star nominees were Jackie Cooper for Skippy (1930/31), and Patty McCormack for The Bad Seed (1956). The first winning child star was 16 year old Patty Duke for The Miracle Worker (1962).]

Janet Leigh received only one Oscar nomination in her career, for Psycho - which she lost! Other memorable unnominated roles included her role as Charlton Heston's terrorized wife Susan Vargas in Orson Welles' Touch Of Evil (1958) or as Rosie, Frank Sinatra's love interest in John Frankenheimer's The Manchurian Candidate (1962). Likewise, 1960 was the year for Trevor Howard's sole nomination in a career with many outstanding but un-nominated acting roles, such as in Brief Encounter (1946) and The Third Man (1949).

Oscar Snubs and Omissions:

It was appalling that Best Picture-nominated The Alamo edged out Hitchcock's superior thriller Psycho (with four unsuccessful nominations) and Stanley Kubrick's Spartacus for Best Picture nominations. This was Hitchcock's fifth nomination as director (from 1940-1960) - he would never be nominated again for Best Director.

Two other omissions for Psycho must be noted:

  • the famous, recognizable score by Bernard Herrmann
  • Anthony Perkins in his most famous role as the twitchy, schizophrenic, and chilling mother-obsessed Bates Motel manager/serial killer psycho Norman Bates
    [Note: Perkins received only one nomination in his entire career - for Friendly Persuasion (1956).]

Both Montgomery Clift and Jo Van Fleet were denied nominations as TVA agent Chuck Glover and as evicted 80 year old widow Ella Garth in Elia Kazan's issue-oriented drama Wild River, and Alec Guinness was likewise ignored in the nominees as brutal and crude Lt. Col. Jock Sinclair in director Ronald Neame's Tunes of Glory. Fredric March was neglected for his performance as Matthew Harrison Brady opposite nominated Spencer Tracy in Inherit the Wind. And Doris Day was omitted as a Best Actress nominee for one of her few (and last) dramatic roles as the hysterical and threatened Kit Preston in the Hitchcock-like mystery thriller Midnight Lace (with only one nomination for Best Costume Design).

Jean Simmons, who played Varinia - a slave girl loved by Spartacus, was denied a nomination (opposite the powerhouse performance of Best Actor-winning Burt Lancaster) for her part as devout evangelist Sister Sharon in Elmer Gantry - the film also lacked a nomination for its first-time director Richard Brooks.

And Ralph Bellamy, recreating his Tony Award-winning role of FDR opposite nominated Greer Garson was denied a nomination in Sunrise at Campobello. Robert Mitchum was not a nominee for his role as Paddy Carmody in The Sundowners (1960). [Throughout his entire career, he received only one nomination, a supporting one for his performance in the war film The Story of G.I. Joe (1945).]

Director Otto Preminger effectively ended the blacklisting of Dalton Trumbo, by putting the writer's real name on the screenplay for Exodus. (Trumbo, under the pseudonym of Robert Rich, won the Best Writing: Original Story Award (his second and last nomination and sole Oscar win) for The Brave One (1956).) And finally, why wasn't Fred MacMurray nominated in a supporting role as a cad businessman in The Apartment instead of Jack Kruschen?


Oscars of the 1960's - History

The winners are listed first, in CAPITAL letters, in each category.
Click on individual year for details.
See all Movie Title Screens for 1940-1949

Best Picture

REBECCA (1940)

All This, And Heaven Too (1940)

Foreign Correspondent (1940)

The Grapes of Wrath (1940)

The Great Dictator (1940)

Kitty Foyle (1940)

The Letter (1940)

The Long Voyage Home (1940)

Our Town (1940)

The Philadelphia Story (1940)

Actor:
JAMES STEWART in "The Philadelphia Story", Charles Chaplin in "The Great Dictator", Henry Fonda in "The Grapes of Wrath", Raymond Massey in "Abe Lincoln in Illinois", Laurence Olivier in "Rebecca"
Actress:
GINGER ROGERS in "Kitty Foyle", Bette Davis in "The Letter", Joan Fontaine in "Rebecca", Katharine Hepburn in "The Philadelphia Story", Martha Scott in "Our Town"
Supporting Actor:
WALTER BRENNAN in "The Westerner", Albert Basserman in "Foreign Correspondent", William Gargan in "They Knew What They Wanted", Jack Oakie in "The Great Dictator", James Stephenson in "The Letter"
Supporting Actress:
JANE DARWELL in "The Grapes of Wrath", Judith Anderson in "Rebecca", Ruth Hussey in "The Philadelphia Story", Barbara O'Neil in "All This, and Heaven Too", Marjorie Rambeau in "Primrose Path"
Director:
JOHN FORD for "The Grapes of Wrath", George Cukor for "The Philadelphia Story", Alfred Hitchcock for "Rebecca", Sam Wood for "Kitty Foyle", William Wyler for "The Letter"

Best Picture

HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY (1941)

Blossoms in the Dust (1941)

Citizen Kane (1941)

Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941)

Hold Back the Dawn (1941)

The Little Foxes (1941)

The Maltese Falcon (1941)

One Foot in Heaven (1941)

Sergeant York (1941)

Suspicion (1941)

Actor:
GARY COOPER in "Sergeant York", Cary Grant in "Penny Serenade", Walter Huston in "All That Money Can Buy", Robert Montgomery in "Here Comes Mr. Jordan", Orson Welles in "Citizen Kane"
Actress:
JOAN FONTAINE in "Suspicion", Bette Davis in "The Little Foxes", Olivia de Havilland in "Hold Back the Dawn", Greer Garson in "Blossoms in the Dust", Barbara Stanwyck in "Ball of Fire"
Supporting Actor:
DONALD CRISP in "How Green Was My Valley", Walter Brennan in "Sergeant York", Charles Coburn in "The Devil and Miss Jones", James Gleason in "Here Comes Mr. Jordan", Sydney Greenstreet in "The Maltese Falcon"
Supporting Actress:
MARY ASTOR in "The Great Lie", Sara Allgood in "How Green Was My Valley", Patricia Collinge in "The Little Foxes", Teresa Wright in "The Little Foxes", Margaret Wycherly in "Sergeant York"
Director:
JOHN FORD for "How Green Was My Valley", Alexander Hall for "Here Comes Mr. Jordan", Howard Hawks for "Sergeant York", Orson Welles for "Citizen Kane", William Wyler for "The Little Foxes"

Best Picture

MRS. MINIVER (1942)

The Invaders (1941, UK) (aka 49th Parallel)

Kings Row (1942)

The Magnificent Ambersons (1942)

The Pied Piper (1942)

The Pride of the Yankees (1942)

Random Harvest (1942)

The Talk of the Town (1942)

Wake Island (1942)

Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942)

Actor:
JAMES CAGNEY in "Yankee Doodle Dandy", Ronald Colman in "Random Harvest", Gary Cooper in "The Pride of the Yankees", Walter Pidgeon in "Mrs. Miniver", Monty Woolley in "The Pied Piper"
Actress:
GREER GARSON in "Mrs. Miniver", Bette Davis in "Now, Voyager", Katharine Hepburn in "Woman of the Year", Rosalind Russell in "My Sister Eileen", Teresa Wright in "The Pride of the Yankees"
Supporting Actor:
VAN HEFLIN in "Johnny Eager", William Bendix in "Wake Island", Walter Huston in "Yankee Doodle Dandy", Frank Morgan in "Tortilla Flat", Henry Travers in "Mrs. Miniver"
Supporting Actress:
TERESA WRIGHT in "Mrs. Miniver", Gladys Cooper in "Now, Voyager", Agnes Moorehead in "The Magnificent Ambersons", Susan Peters in "Random Harvest", Dame May Whitty in "Mrs. Miniver"
Director:
WILLIAM WYLER for "Mrs. Miniver", Michael Curtiz for "Yankee Doodle Dandy", John Farrow for "Wake Island", Mervyn LeRoy for "Random Harvest", Sam Wood for "Kings Row"

Best Picture

CASABLANCA (1942)

For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943)

Heaven Can Wait (1943)

The Human Comedy (1943)

In Which We Serve (1942, UK)

Madame Curie (1943)

The More the Merrier (1943)

The Ox-Bow Incident (1943)

The Song of Bernadette (1943)

Watch on the Rhine (1943)

Actor:
PAUL LUKAS in "Watch on the Rhine", Humphrey Bogart in "Casablanca", Gary Cooper in "For Whom the Bell Tolls", Walter Pidgeon in "Madame Curie", Mickey Rooney in "The Human Comedy"
Actress:
JENNIFER JONES in "The Song of Bernadette", Jean Arthur in "The More the Merrier", Ingrid Bergman in "For Whom the Bell Tolls", Joan Fontaine in "The Constant Nymph", Greer Garson in "Madame Curie"
Supporting Actor:
CHARLES COBURN in "The More the Merrier", Charles Bickford in "The Song of Bernadette", J. Carrol Naish in "Sahara", Claude Rains in "Casablanca", Akim Tamiroff in "For Whom the Bell Tolls"
Supporting Actress:
KATINA PAXINOU in "For Whom the Bell Tolls", Gladys Cooper in "The Song of Bernadette", Paulette Goddard in "So Proudly We Hail!", Anne Revere in "The Song of Bernadette", Lucile Watson in "Watch on the Rhine"
Director:
MICHAEL CURTIZ for "Casablanca", Clarence Brown for "The Human Comedy", Henry King for "The Song of Bernadette", Ernst Lubitsch for "Heaven Can Wait", George Stevens for "The More the Merrier"

Best Picture

GOING MY WAY (1944)

Double Indemnity (1944)

Gaslight (1944)

Since You Went Away (1944)

Wilson (1944)

Actor:
BING CROSBY in "Going My Way", Charles Boyer in "Gaslight", Barry Fitzgerald in "Going My Way", Cary Grant in "None But the Lonely Heart", Alexander Knox in "Wilson"
Actress:
INGRID BERGMAN in "Gaslight", Claudette Colbert in "Since You Went Away", Bette Davis in "Mr. Skeffington", Greer Garson in "Mrs. Parkington", Barbara Stanwyck in "Double Indemnity"
Supporting Actor:
BARRY FITZGERALD in "Going My Way", Hume Cronyn in "The Seventh Cross", Claude Rains in "Mr. Skeffington", Clifton Webb in "Laura", Monty Woolley in "Since You Went Away"
Supporting Actress:
ETHEL BARRYMORE in "None But the Lonely Heart", Jennifer Jones in "Since You Went Away", Angela Lansbury in "Gaslight", Aline MacMahon in "Dragon Seed", Agnes Moorehead in "Mrs. Parkington"
Director:
LEO MCCAREY for "Going My Way", Alfred Hitchcock for "Lifeboat", Henry King for "Wilson", Otto Preminger for "Laura", Billy Wilder for "Double Indemnity"

Best Picture

THE LOST WEEKEND (1945)

Anchors Aweigh (1945)

The Bells of St. Mary's (1945)

Mildred Pierce (1945)

Spellbound (1945)

Actor:
RAY MILLAND in "The Lost Weekend", Bing Crosby in "The Bells of St. Mary's", Gene Kelly in "Anchors Aweigh", Gregory Peck in "The Keys of the Kingdom", Cornel Wilde in "A Song to Remember"
Actress:
JOAN CRAWFORD in "Mildred Pierce", Ingrid Bergman in "The Bells of St. Mary's", Greer Garson in "The Valley of Decision", Jennifer Jones in "Love Letters", Gene Tierney in "Leave Her to Heaven"
Supporting Actor:
JAMES DUNN in "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn", Michael Chekhov in "Spellbound", John Dall in "The Corn Is Green", Robert Mitchum in "The Story of G.I. Joe", J. Carrol Naish in "A Medal for Benny"
Supporting Actress:
ANNE REVERE in "National Velvet", Eve Arden in "Mildred Pierce", Ann Blyth in "Mildred Pierce", Angela Lansbury in "The Picture of Dorian Gray", Joan Lorring in "The Corn Is Green"
Director:
BILLY WILDER for "The Lost Weekend", Clarence Brown for "National Velvet", Alfred Hitchcock for "Spellbound", Leo McCarey for "The Bells of St. Mary's", Jean Renoir for "The Southerner"

Best Picture

THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES (1946)

(King) Henry V (1944, UK) (aka The Chronicle History of King Henry the Fift with His Battell Fought at Agincourt in France)

It's A Wonderful Life (1946)

The Razor's Edge (1946)

The Yearling (1946)

Actor:
FREDRIC MARCH in "The Best Years of Our Lives", Laurence Olivier in "Henry V", Larry Parks in "The Jolson Story", Gregory Peck in "The Yearling", James Stewart in "It's A Wonderful Life"
Actress:
OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND in "To Each His Own", Celia Johnson in "Brief Encounter", Jennifer Jones in "Duel in the Sun", Rosalind Russell in "Sister Kenny", Jane Wyman in "The Yearling"
Supporting Actor:
HAROLD RUSSELL in "The Best Years of Our Lives", Charles Coburn in "The Green Years", William Demarest in "The Jolson Story", Claude Rains in "Notorious", Clifton Webb in "The Razor's Edge"
Supporting Actress:
ANNE BAXTER in "The Razor's Edge", Ethel Barrymore in "The Spiral Staircase", Lillian Gish in "Duel in the Sun", Flora Robson in "Saratoga Trunk", Gale Sondergaard in "Anna and the King of Siam"
Director:
WILLIAM WYLER for "The Best Years of Our Lives", Clarence Brown for "The Yearling", Frank Capra for "It's A Wonderful Life", David Lean for "Brief Encounter", Robert Siodmak for "The Killers"

Best Picture

GENTLEMAN'S AGREEMENT (1947)

The Bishop's Wife (1947)

Crossfire (1947)

Great Expectations (1946, UK)

Miracle on 34th Street (1947)

Actor:
RONALD COLMAN in "A Double Life", John Garfield in "Body and Soul", Gregory Peck in "Gentleman's Agreement", William Powell in "Life With Father", Michael Redgrave in "Mourning Becomes Electra"
Actress:
LORETTA YOUNG in "The Farmer's Daughter", Joan Crawford in "Possessed", Susan Hayward in "Smash Up - The Story of a Woman", Dorothy McGuire in "Gentleman's Agreement", Rosalind Russell in "Mourning Becomes Electra"
Supporting Actor:
EDMUND GWENN in "Miracle on 34th Street", Charles Bickford in "The Farmer's Daughter", Thomas Gomez in "Ride the Pink Horse", Robert Ryan in "Crossfire", Richard Widmark in "Kiss of Death"
Supporting Actress:
CELESTE HOLM in "Gentleman's Agreement", Ethel Barrymore in "The Paradine Case", Gloria Grahame in "Crossfire", Marjorie Main in "The Egg and I", Anne Revere in "Gentleman's Agreement"
Director:
ELIA KAZAN for "Gentleman's Agreement", George Cukor for "A Double Life", Edward Dmytryk for "Crossfire", Henry Koster for "The Bishop's Wife", David Lean for "Great Expectations"

Best Picture

HAMLET (1948, UK)

Johnny Belinda (1948)

The Red Shoes (1948, UK)

The Snake Pit (1948)

The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948)

Actor:
LAURENCE OLIVIER in "Hamlet", Lew Ayres in "Johnny Belinda", Montgomery Clift in "The Search", Dan Dailey in "When My Baby Smiles at Me", Clifton Webb in "Sitting Pretty"
Actress:
JANE WYMAN in "Johnny Belinda", Ingrid Bergman in "Joan of Arc", Olivia de Havilland in "The Snake Pit", Irene Dunne in "I Remember Mama", Barbara Stanwyck in "Sorry, Wrong Number"
Supporting Actor:
WALTER HUSTON in "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre", Charles Bickford in "Johnny Belinda", Jose Ferrer in "Joan of Arc", Oscar Homolka in "I Remember Mama", Cecil Kellaway in "The Luck of the Irish"
Supporting Actress:
CLAIRE TREVOR in "Key Largo", Barbara Bel Geddes in "I Remember Mama", Ellen Corby in "I Remember Mama", Agnes Moorehead in "Johnny Belinda", Jean Simmons in "Hamlet"
Director:
JOHN HUSTON for "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre", Anatole Litvak for "The Snake Pit", Jean Negulesco for "Johnny Belinda", Laurence Olivier for "Hamlet", Fred Zinnemann for "The Search"

Best Picture

ALL THE KING'S MEN (1949)

Battleground (1949)

The Heiress (1949)

A Letter to Three Wives (1949)

Twelve O'Clock High (1949)

Actor:
BRODERICK CRAWFORD in "All the King's Men", Kirk Douglas in "Champion", Gregory Peck in "Twelve O'Clock High", Richard Todd in "The Hasty Heart", John Wayne in "Sands of Iwo Jima"
Actress:
OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND in "The Heiress", Jeanne Crain in "Pinky", Susan Hayward in "My Foolish Heart", Deborah Kerr in "Edward, My Son", Loretta Young in "Come to the Stable"
Supporting Actor:
DEAN JAGGER in "Twelve O'Clock High", John Ireland in "All the King's Men", Arthur Kennedy in "Champion", Ralph Richardson in "The Heiress", James Whitmore in "Battleground"
Supporting Actress:
MERCEDES MCCAMBRIDGE in "All the King's Men", Ethel Barrymore in "Pinky", Celeste Holm in "Come to the Stable", Elsa Lanchester in "Come to the Stable", Ethel Waters in "Pinky"
Director:
JOSEPH L. MANKIEWICZ for "A Letter to Three Wives", Carol Reed for "The Fallen Idol", Robert Rossen for "All the King's Men", William A. Wellman for "Battleground", William Wyler for "The Heiress"


ART DIRECTION (Color)

Cimarron – Art Direction: George W. Davis, Addison Hehr Set Decoration: Henry Grace, Hugh Hunt, Otto Siegel
It Started in Naples – Art Direction: Hal Pereira, Roland Anderson Set Decoration: Sam Comer, Arrigo Breschi
Pepe – Art Direction: Ted Haworth Set Decoration: William Kiernan
Spartacus – Art Direction: Alexander Golitzen, Eric Orbom Set Decoration: Russell A. Gausman, Julia Heron
Sunrise at Campobello – Art Direction: Edward Carrere Set Decoration: George James Hopkins


Contents

In the following table, the years are listed as per Academy convention, and generally correspond to the year of film release in Los Angeles County, California the ceremonies are always held the following year. [9] For the first five ceremonies, the eligibility period spanned twelve months from August 1 to July 31. [10] For the 6th ceremony held in 1934, the eligibility period lasted from August 1, 1932, to December 31, 1933. [10] Since the 7th ceremony held in 1935, the period of eligibility became the full previous calendar year from January 1 to December 31. [10]

1920s Edit

Year Director(s) Film Ref.
1927/28
(1st)
[note 1]
Frank Borzage (Dramatic Picture) 7th Heaven [11]
Herbert Brenon (Dramatic Picture) Sorrell and Son
King Vidor (Dramatic Picture) The Crowd
Lewis Milestone (Comedy Picture) Two Arabian Knights
Ted Wilde (Comedy Picture) Speedy
1928/1929
(2nd)
[note 2]
Frank Lloyd The Divine Lady [12]
Lionel Barrymore Madame X
Harry Beaumont The Broadway Melody
Irving Cummings In Old Arizona
Frank Lloyd Drag
Weary River
Ernst Lubitsch The Patriot

1930s Edit

Year Director(s) Film Ref.
1929/1930
(3rd)
Lewis Milestone All Quiet on the Western Front [13]
Clarence Brown Anna Christie
Romance
Robert Z. Leonard The Divorcee
Ernst Lubitsch The Love Parade
King Vidor Hallelujah!
1930/1931
(4th)
Norman Taurog Skippy [14]
Clarence Brown A Free Soul
Lewis Milestone The Front Page
Wesley Ruggles Cimarron
Josef von Sternberg Morocco
1931/1932
(5th)
Frank Borzage Bad Girl [15]
King Vidor The Champ
Josef von Sternberg Shanghai Express
1932/1933
(6th)
Frank Lloyd Cavalcade [16]
Frank Capra Lady for a Day
George Cukor Little Women
1934
(7th)
Frank Capra It Happened One Night [17]
Victor Schertzinger One Night of Love
W. S. Van Dyke The Thin Man
1935
(8th)
John Ford The Informer [18]
Henry Hathaway The Lives of a Bengal Lancer
Frank Lloyd Mutiny on the Bounty
1936
(9th)
Frank Capra Mr. Deeds Goes to Town [19]
Gregory La Cava My Man Godfrey
Robert Z. Leonard The Great Ziegfeld
W. S. Van Dyke San Francisco
William Wyler Dodsworth
1937
(10th)
Leo McCarey The Awful Truth [20]
William Dieterle The Life of Emile Zola
Sidney Franklin The Good Earth
Gregory La Cava Stage Door
William A. Wellman A Star Is Born
1938
(11th)
Frank Capra You Can't Take It with You [21]
Michael Curtiz Angels with Dirty Faces
Four Daughters
Norman Taurog Boys Town
King Vidor The Citadel
1939
(12th)
Victor Fleming Gone with the Wind [22]
Frank Capra Mr. Smith Goes to Washington
John Ford Stagecoach
Sam Wood Goodbye, Mr. Chips
William Wyler Wuthering Heights

1940s Edit

Year Director(s) Film Ref.
1940
(13th)
John Ford The Grapes of Wrath [23]
George Cukor The Philadelphia Story
Alfred Hitchcock Rebecca
Sam Wood Kitty Foyle
William Wyler The Letter
1941
(14th)
John Ford How Green Was My Valley [24]
Alexander Hall Here Comes Mr. Jordan
Howard Hawks Sergeant York
Orson Welles Citizen Kane
William Wyler The Little Foxes
1942
(15th)
William Wyler Mrs. Miniver [25]
Michael Curtiz Yankee Doodle Dandy
John Farrow Wake Island
Mervyn LeRoy Random Harvest
Sam Wood Kings Row
1943
(16th)
Michael Curtiz Casablanca [26]
Clarence Brown The Human Comedy
Henry King The Song of Bernadette
Ernst Lubitsch Heaven Can Wait
George Stevens The More the Merrier
1944
(17th)
Leo McCarey Going My Way [27]
Alfred Hitchcock Lifeboat
Henry King Wilson
Otto Preminger Laura
Billy Wilder Double Indemnity
1945
(18th)
Billy Wilder The Lost Weekend [28]
Clarence Brown National Velvet
Alfred Hitchcock Spellbound
Leo McCarey The Bells of St. Mary's
Jean Renoir The Southerner
1946
(19th)
William Wyler The Best Years of Our Lives [29]
Clarence Brown The Yearling
Frank Capra It's a Wonderful Life
David Lean Brief Encounter
Robert Siodmak The Killers
1947
(20th)
Elia Kazan Gentleman's Agreement [30]
George Cukor A Double Life
Edward Dmytryk Crossfire
Henry Koster The Bishop's Wife
David Lean Great Expectations
1948
(21st)
John Huston The Treasure of the Sierra Madre [31]
Anatole Litvak The Snake Pit
Jean Negulesco Johnny Belinda
Laurence Olivier Hamlet
Fred Zinnemann The Search
1949
(22nd)
Joseph L. Mankiewicz A Letter to Three Wives [32]
Carol Reed The Fallen Idol
Robert Rossen All the King's Men
William A. Wellman Battleground
William Wyler The Heiress

1950s Edit

Year Director(s) Film Ref.
1950
(23rd)
Joseph L. Mankiewicz All About Eve [33]
George Cukor Born Yesterday
John Huston The Asphalt Jungle
Carol Reed The Third Man
Billy Wilder Sunset Boulevard
1951
(24th)
George Stevens A Place in the Sun [34]
John Huston The African Queen
Elia Kazan A Streetcar Named Desire
Vincente Minnelli An American in Paris
William Wyler Detective Story
1952
(25th)
John Ford The Quiet Man [35]
Cecil B. DeMille The Greatest Show on Earth
John Huston Moulin Rouge
Joseph L. Mankiewicz 5 Fingers
Fred Zinnemann High Noon
1953
(26th)
Fred Zinnemann From Here to Eternity [36]
George Stevens Shane
Charles Walters Lili
Billy Wilder Stalag 17
William Wyler Roman Holiday
1954
(27th)
Elia Kazan On the Waterfront [37]
Alfred Hitchcock Rear Window
George Seaton The Country Girl
William A. Wellman The High and the Mighty
Billy Wilder Sabrina
1955
(28th)
Delbert Mann Marty [38]
Elia Kazan East of Eden
David Lean Summertime
Joshua Logan Picnic
John Sturges Bad Day at Black Rock
1956
(29th)
George Stevens Giant [39]
Michael Anderson Around the World in 80 Days
Walter Lang The King and I
King Vidor War and Peace
William Wyler Friendly Persuasion
1957
(30th)
David Lean The Bridge on the River Kwai [40]
Joshua Logan Sayonara
Sidney Lumet 12 Angry Men
Mark Robson Peyton Place
Billy Wilder Witness for the Prosecution
1958
(31st)
Vincente Minnelli Gigi [41]
Richard Brooks Cat on a Hot Tin Roof
Stanley Kramer The Defiant Ones
Mark Robson The Inn of the Sixth Happiness
Robert Wise I Want to Live!
1959
(32nd)
William Wyler Ben-Hur [42]
Jack Clayton Room at the Top
George Stevens The Diary of Anne Frank
Billy Wilder Some Like It Hot
Fred Zinnemann The Nun's Story

1960s Edit

Year Director(s) Film Ref.
1960
(33rd)
Billy Wilder The Apartment [43]
Jack Cardiff Sons and Lovers
Jules Dassin Never on Sunday
Alfred Hitchcock Psycho
Fred Zinnemann The Sundowners
1961
(34th)
Jerome Robbins & Robert Wise West Side Story [44]
Federico Fellini La Dolce Vita
Stanley Kramer Judgment at Nuremberg
Robert Rossen The Hustler
J. Lee Thompson The Guns of Navarone
1962
(35th)
David Lean Lawrence of Arabia [45]
Pietro Germi Divorce Italian Style
Robert Mulligan To Kill a Mockingbird
Arthur Penn The Miracle Worker
Frank Perry David and Lisa
1963
(36th)
Tony Richardson Tom Jones [46]
Federico Fellini
Elia Kazan America America
Otto Preminger The Cardinal
Martin Ritt Hud
1964
(37th)
George Cukor My Fair Lady [47]
Michael Cacoyannis Zorba the Greek
Peter Glenville Becket
Stanley Kubrick Dr. Strangelove
Robert Stevenson Mary Poppins
1965
(38th)
Robert Wise The Sound of Music [48]
David Lean Doctor Zhivago
John Schlesinger Darling
Hiroshi Teshigahara Woman in the Dunes
William Wyler The Collector
1966
(39th)
Fred Zinnemann A Man for All Seasons [49]
Michelangelo Antonioni Blowup
Richard Brooks The Professionals
Claude Lelouch A Man and a Woman
Mike Nichols Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
1967
(40th)
Mike Nichols The Graduate [50]
Richard Brooks In Cold Blood
Norman Jewison In the Heat of the Night
Stanley Kramer Guess Who's Coming to Dinner
Arthur Penn Bonnie and Clyde
1968
(41st)
Carol Reed Oliver! [51]
Anthony Harvey The Lion in Winter
Stanley Kubrick 2001: A Space Odyssey
Gillo Pontecorvo The Battle of Algiers
Franco Zeffirelli Romeo and Juliet
1969
(42nd)
John Schlesinger Midnight Cowboy [52]
Costa-Gavras Z
George Roy Hill Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
Arthur Penn Alice's Restaurant
Sydney Pollack They Shoot Horses, Don't They?

1970s Edit

Year Director(s) Film Ref.
1970
(43rd)
Franklin J. Schaffner Patton [53]
Robert Altman M*A*S*H
Federico Fellini Fellini Satyricon
Arthur Hiller Love Story
Ken Russell Women in Love
1971
(44th)
William Friedkin The French Connection [54]
Peter Bogdanovich The Last Picture Show
Norman Jewison Fiddler on the Roof
Stanley Kubrick A Clockwork Orange
John Schlesinger Sunday Bloody Sunday
1972
(45th)
Bob Fosse Cabaret [55]
John Boorman Deliverance
Francis Ford Coppola The Godfather
Joseph L. Mankiewicz Sleuth
Jan Troell The Emigrants
1973
(46th)
George Roy Hill The Sting [56]
Ingmar Bergman Cries and Whispers
Bernardo Bertolucci Last Tango in Paris
William Friedkin The Exorcist
George Lucas American Graffiti
1974
(47th)
Francis Ford Coppola The Godfather Part II [57]
John Cassavetes A Woman Under the Influence
Bob Fosse Lenny
Roman Polanski Chinatown
François Truffaut Day for Night
1975
(48th)
Miloš Forman One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest [58]
Robert Altman Nashville
Federico Fellini Amarcord
Stanley Kubrick Barry Lyndon
Sidney Lumet Dog Day Afternoon
1976
(49th)
John G. Avildsen Rocky [59]
Ingmar Bergman Face to Face
Sidney Lumet Network
Alan J. Pakula All the President's Men
Lina Wertmüller Seven Beauties
1977
(50th)
Woody Allen Annie Hall [60]
George Lucas Star Wars
Herbert Ross The Turning Point
Steven Spielberg Close Encounters of the Third Kind
Fred Zinnemann Julia
1978
(51st)
Michael Cimino The Deer Hunter [61]
Woody Allen Interiors
Hal Ashby Coming Home
Warren Beatty & Buck Henry Heaven Can Wait
Alan Parker Midnight Express
1979
(52nd)
Robert Benton Kramer vs. Kramer [62]
Francis Ford Coppola Apocalypse Now
Bob Fosse All That Jazz
Édouard Molinaro La Cage aux Folles
Peter Yates Breaking Away

1980s Edit

Year Director(s) Film Ref.
1980
(53rd)
Robert Redford Ordinary People [63]
David Lynch The Elephant Man
Roman Polanski Tess
Richard Rush The Stunt Man
Martin Scorsese Raging Bull
1981
(54th)
Warren Beatty Reds [64]
Hugh Hudson Chariots of Fire
Louis Malle Atlantic City
Mark Rydell On Golden Pond
Steven Spielberg Raiders of the Lost Ark
1982
(55th)
Richard Attenborough Gandhi [65]
Sidney Lumet The Verdict
Wolfgang Petersen Das Boot
Sydney Pollack Tootsie
Steven Spielberg E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial
1983
(56th)
James L. Brooks Terms of Endearment [66]
Bruce Beresford Tender Mercies
Ingmar Bergman Fanny and Alexander
Mike Nichols Silkwood
Peter Yates The Dresser
1984
(57th)
Miloš Forman Amadeus [67]
Woody Allen Broadway Danny Rose
Robert Benton Places in the Heart
Roland Joffé The Killing Fields
David Lean A Passage to India
1985
(58th)
Sydney Pollack Out of Africa [68]
Héctor Babenco Kiss of the Spider Woman
John Huston Prizzi's Honor
Akira Kurosawa Ran
Peter Weir Witness
1986
(59th)
Oliver Stone Platoon [69]
Woody Allen Hannah and Her Sisters
James Ivory A Room with a View
Roland Joffé The Mission
David Lynch Blue Velvet
1987
(60th)
Bernardo Bertolucci The Last Emperor [70]
John Boorman Hope and Glory
Lasse Hallström My Life as a Dog
Norman Jewison Moonstruck
Adrian Lyne Fatal Attraction
1988
(61st)
Barry Levinson Rain Man [71]
Charles Crichton A Fish Called Wanda
Mike Nichols Working Girl
Alan Parker Mississippi Burning
Martin Scorsese The Last Temptation of Christ
1989
(62nd)
Oliver Stone Born on the Fourth of July [72]
Woody Allen Crimes and Misdemeanors
Kenneth Branagh Henry V
Jim Sheridan My Left Foot
Peter Weir Dead Poets Society

1990s Edit

Year Director(s) Film Ref.
1990
(63rd)
Kevin Costner Dances with Wolves [73]
Francis Ford Coppola The Godfather Part III
Stephen Frears The Grifters
Barbet Schroeder Reversal of Fortune
Martin Scorsese Goodfellas
1991
(64th)
Jonathan Demme The Silence of the Lambs [74]
Barry Levinson Bugsy
Ridley Scott Thelma & Louise
John Singleton Boyz n the Hood
Oliver Stone JFK
1992
(65th)
Clint Eastwood Unforgiven [75]
Robert Altman The Player
Martin Brest Scent of a Woman
James Ivory Howards End
Neil Jordan The Crying Game
1993
(66th)
Steven Spielberg Schindler's List [76]
Robert Altman Short Cuts
Jane Campion The Piano
James Ivory The Remains of the Day
Jim Sheridan In the Name of the Father
1994
(67th)
Robert Zemeckis Forrest Gump [77]
Woody Allen Bullets over Broadway
Krzysztof Kieślowski Three Colours: Red
Robert Redford Quiz Show
Quentin Tarantino Pulp Fiction
1995
(68th)
Mel Gibson Braveheart [78]
Mike Figgis Leaving Las Vegas
Chris Noonan Babe
Michael Radford Il Postino: The Postman
Tim Robbins Dead Man Walking
1996
(69th)
Anthony Minghella The English Patient [79]
Joel Coen Fargo
Miloš Forman The People vs. Larry Flynt
Scott Hicks Shine
Mike Leigh Secrets & Lies
1997
(70th)
James Cameron Titanic [80]
Peter Cattaneo The Full Monty
Atom Egoyan The Sweet Hereafter
Curtis Hanson L.A. Confidential
Gus Van Sant Good Will Hunting
1998
(71st)
Steven Spielberg Saving Private Ryan [81]
Roberto Benigni Life Is Beautiful
John Madden Shakespeare in Love
Terrence Malick The Thin Red Line
Peter Weir The Truman Show
1999
(72nd)
Sam Mendes American Beauty [82]
Lasse Hallström The Cider House Rules
Spike Jonze Being John Malkovich
Michael Mann The Insider
M. Night Shyamalan The Sixth Sense

2000s Edit

Year Director(s) Film Ref.
2000
(73rd)
Steven Soderbergh Traffic [83]
Stephen Daldry Billy Elliot
Ang Lee Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
Ridley Scott Gladiator
Steven Soderbergh Erin Brockovich
2001
(74th)
Ron Howard A Beautiful Mind [84]
Robert Altman Gosford Park
Peter Jackson The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
David Lynch Mulholland Drive
Ridley Scott Black Hawk Down
2002
(75th)
Roman Polanski The Pianist [85]
Pedro Almodóvar Talk to Her
Stephen Daldry The Hours
Rob Marshall Chicago
Martin Scorsese Gangs of New York
2003
(76th)
Peter Jackson The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King [86]
Sofia Coppola Lost in Translation
Clint Eastwood Mystic River
Fernando Meirelles City of God
Peter Weir Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World
2004
(77th)
Clint Eastwood Million Dollar Baby [87]
Taylor Hackford Ray
Mike Leigh Vera Drake
Alexander Payne Sideways
Martin Scorsese The Aviator
2005
(78th)
Ang Lee Brokeback Mountain [88]
George Clooney Good Night, and Good Luck
Paul Haggis Crash
Bennett Miller Capote
Steven Spielberg Munich
2006
(79th)
Martin Scorsese The Departed [89]
Clint Eastwood Letters from Iwo Jima
Stephen Frears The Queen
Paul Greengrass United 93
Alejandro González Iñárritu Babel
2007
(80th)
Coen Brothers No Country for Old Men [90]
Paul Thomas Anderson There Will Be Blood
Tony Gilroy Michael Clayton
Jason Reitman Juno
Julian Schnabel The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
2008
(81st)
Danny Boyle Slumdog Millionaire [91]
Stephen Daldry The Reader
David Fincher The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
Ron Howard Frost/Nixon
Gus Van Sant Milk
2009
(82nd)
Kathryn Bigelow The Hurt Locker [92]
James Cameron Avatar
Lee Daniels Precious
Jason Reitman Up in the Air
Quentin Tarantino Inglourious Basterds

2010s Edit

Year Director(s) Film Ref.
2010
(83rd)
Tom Hooper The King's Speech [93]
Darren Aronofsky Black Swan
Coen Brothers True Grit
David Fincher The Social Network
David O. Russell The Fighter
2011
(84th)
Michel Hazanavicius The Artist [94]
Woody Allen Midnight in Paris
Terrence Malick The Tree of Life
Alexander Payne The Descendants
Martin Scorsese Hugo
2012
(85th)
Ang Lee Life of Pi [95]
Michael Haneke Amour
David O. Russell Silver Linings Playbook
Steven Spielberg Lincoln
Benh Zeitlin Beasts of the Southern Wild
2013
(86th)
Alfonso Cuarón Gravity [96]
Steve McQueen 12 Years a Slave
Alexander Payne Nebraska
David O. Russell American Hustle
Martin Scorsese The Wolf of Wall Street
2014
(87th)
Alejandro González Iñárritu Birdman [97]
Wes Anderson The Grand Budapest Hotel
Richard Linklater Boyhood
Bennett Miller Foxcatcher
Morten Tyldum The Imitation Game
2015
(88th)
Alejandro González Iñárritu The Revenant [98]
Lenny Abrahamson Room
Tom McCarthy Spotlight
Adam McKay The Big Short
George Miller Mad Max: Fury Road
2016
(89th)
Damien Chazelle La La Land [99]
Mel Gibson Hacksaw Ridge
Barry Jenkins Moonlight
Kenneth Lonergan Manchester by the Sea
Denis Villeneuve Arrival
2017
(90th)
Guillermo del Toro The Shape of Water [100]
Paul Thomas Anderson Phantom Thread
Greta Gerwig Lady Bird
Christopher Nolan Dunkirk
Jordan Peele Get Out
2018
(91st)
Alfonso Cuarón Roma [101]
Yorgos Lanthimos The Favourite
Spike Lee BlacKkKlansman
Adam McKay Vice
Paweł Pawlikowski Cold War
2019
(92nd)
Bong Joon-ho Parasite [102]
Sam Mendes 1917
Todd Phillips Joker
Martin Scorsese The Irishman
Quentin Tarantino Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

2020s Edit

Multiple wins Edit

Multiple nominations Edit

Record Director Film Age Ref.
Oldest winner Clint Eastwood Million Dollar Baby 74 [105]
Oldest nominee John Huston Prizzi's Honor 79 [105]
Youngest winner Damien Chazelle La La Land 32 [105]
Youngest nominee John Singleton Boyz n the Hood 24 [105]

Asian nominees/winners Edit

Seven directors of Asian descent have been nominated a total of nine times in this category, and three individuals have won the award (with Ang Lee winning twice).

  • 1965 – Hiroshi Teshigahara for Woman in the Dunes
  • 1985 – Akira Kurosawa for Ran
  • 1999 – M. Night Shyamalan for The Sixth Sense
  • 2000 – Ang Lee for Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
  • 2005 – Ang Lee for Brokeback Mountain
  • 2012 – Ang Lee for Life of Pi
  • 2019 – Bong Joon-ho for Parasite
  • 2020 – Lee Isaac Chung for Minari
  • 2020 – Chloé Zhao for Nomadland

Black nominees Edit

Six black directors have been nominated a total of six times in this category, and none have won the award. [106]

  • 1991 – John Singleton for Boyz n the Hood §
  • 2009 – Lee Daniels for Precious
  • 2013 – Steve McQueen for 12 Years a Slave
  • 2016 – Barry Jenkins for Moonlight
  • 2017 – Jordan Peele for Get Out §†
  • 2018 – Spike Lee for BlacKkKlansman

Latin American nominees/winners Edit

Five Latin American directors have been nominated a total of eight times in this category, and three have won the award five times.

  • 1985 – / Héctor Babenco for Kiss of the Spider Woman
  • 2003 – Fernando Meirelles for City of God
  • 2006 – Alejandro G. Iñárritu for Babel
  • 2013 – Alfonso Cuarón for Gravity
  • 2014 – Alejandro G. Iñárritu for Birdman
  • 2015 – Alejandro G. Iñárritu for The Revenant
  • 2017 – Guillermo del Toro for The Shape of Water
  • 2018 – Alfonso Cuarón for Roma

Oceanic nominees/winners Edit

Seven Oceanic directors have been nominated a total of eleven times in this category, and one has won the award.

  • 1942 – John Farrow for Wake Island
  • 1983 – Bruce Beresford for Tender Mercies
  • 1985 – Peter Weir for Witness
  • 1989 – Peter Weir for Dead Poets Society
  • 1993 – Jane Campion for The Piano
  • 1995 – Chris Noonan for Babe
  • 1998 – Peter Weir for The Truman Show
  • 2001 – Peter Jackson for The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  • 2003 – Peter Jackson for The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  • 2003 – Peter Weir for Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World
  • 2015 – George Miller for Mad Max: Fury Road

Female nominees/winners Edit

Seven female directors have been nominated in the category, and two have won the award. [107]

  • 1976 – Lina Wertmüller for Seven Beauties
  • 1993 – Jane Campion for The Piano
  • 2003 – Sofia Coppola for Lost in Translation
  • 2009 – Kathryn Bigelow for The Hurt Locker
  • 2017 – Greta Gerwig for Lady Bird §†
  • 2020 – Emerald Fennell for Promising Young Woman §†
  • 2020 – Chloé Zhao for Nomadland

Non-English language nominees/winners Edit

Thirty directors of non-English language films have been nominated a total of thirty-five times in this category, and two have won the award.

  • 1961 – Federico Fellini for La Dolce Vita, Italian
  • 1962 – Pietro Germi for Divorce Italian Style, Italian
  • 1963 – Federico Fellini for , Italian
  • 1964 – / Michael Cacoyannis for Zorba the Greek, Greek †
  • 1965 – Hiroshi Teshigahara for Woman in the Dunes, Japanese
  • 1966 – Michelangelo Antonioni for Blowup, Italian
  • 1966 – Claude Lelouch for A Man and a Woman, French
  • 1968 – Gillo Pontecorvo for The Battle of Algiers, Arabic & French
  • 1969 – / Costa-Gavras for Z, French †
  • 1970 – Federico Fellini for Fellini Satyricon, Italian
  • 1972 – Jan Troell for The Emigrants, Swedish †
  • 1973 – Ingmar Bergman for Cries and Whispers, Swedish †
  • 1974 – François Truffaut for Day for Night, French
  • 1975 – Federico Fellini for Amarcord, Italian
  • 1976 – Ingmar Bergman for Face to Face, Swedish
  • 1976 – Lina Wertmüller for Seven Beauties, Italian
  • 1979 – Édouard Molinaro for La Cage aux Folles, French
  • 1982 – Wolfgang Petersen for Das Boot, German
  • 1983 – Ingmar Bergman for Fanny and Alexander, Swedish
  • 1985 – Akira Kurosawa for Ran, Japanese
  • 1987 – Lasse Hallström for My Life as a Dog, Swedish
  • 1994 – Krzysztof Kieślowski for Three Colours: Red, French
  • 1995 – Michael Radford for Il Postino: The Postman, Italian & Spanish †
  • 1998 – Roberto Benigni for Life Is Beautiful, Italian †
  • 2000 – Ang Lee for Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Mandarin Chinese †
  • 2002 – Pedro Almodóvar for Talk to Her, Spanish
  • 2003 – Fernando Meirelles for City of God, Portuguese
  • 2006 – Clint Eastwood for Letters from Iwo Jima, Japanese †
  • 2007 – Julian Schnabel for The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, French
  • 2012 – Michael Haneke for Amour, French †
  • 2018 – Alfonso Cuarón for Roma, Spanish †
  • 2018 – Paweł Pawlikowski for Cold War, Polish
  • 2019 – Bong Joon-ho for Parasite, Korean ‡
  • 2020 – Lee Isaac Chung for Minari, Korean †
  • 2020 – Thomas Vinterberg for Another Round, Danish

bold — Indicates winner
§ — Directorial feature film debut
† — Film nominated for Best Picture
‡ — Film won for Best Picture

  1. ^The Circus originally received a nomination for Best Director (Comedy Picture), as well as nominations for Best Actor and Best Writing (Original Story), all for Charles Chaplin. However, the Academy subsequently decided to remove Chaplin's name from the competitive award categories and instead to confer upon him a Special Award "for acting, writing, directing and producing The Circus". Chilton, Martin (May 16, 2016). "The first Oscars: what happened in 1929" . The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on May 16, 2016 . Retrieved February 25, 2021 .
  2. ^ The 2nd Academy Awards is unique in being the only occasion where there were no official nominees. Subsequent research by AMPAS has resulted in a list of unofficial or de facto nominees, based on records of which films were evaluated by the judges.
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Michael Caulfield/AP

Singer Bjork wore this infamous Marjan Pejoski swan gown, at the 73rd annual Academy Awards in 2001 when she was nominated for best song for "I've Seen it All" from the film "Dancer in the Dark."

It could be said this gown was her "swan song" since she hasn't been seen at the Oscars since. The red carpet moment was topped of by Bjork "laying" an egg.


Oscar trivia: Fun facts from Academy Award history

In this Feb. 4, 2019 photo, an Oscar statue appears at the 91st Academy Awards Nominees Luncheon in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Danny Moloshok/Invision/AP, File)

The 92nd annual Academy Awards are just three days away!

So before we make our predictions, it’s time for some Oscar trivia.

Here are some fun facts to impress your friends on Oscar night.

Which three films are the only to win the Big Five Oscars?

“It Happened One Night” (1934), “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975) and “The Silence of the Lambs” (1991) stand atop the Oscar mountain as the only three films to ever win Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Director and Best Screenplay. It truly is an amazing feat if you stop and think about it. While Best Picture and Best Director often share wins, it is insanely hard to have an iconic leading male performance and an iconic leading female performance in the same movie. But that’s exactly what these films did with Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert, Jack Nicholson and Louise Fletcher, and Anthony Hopkins and Jodie Foster.

Which movie won the most Oscars?

The record of 11 wins is shared by a trio of beloved epics: “Ben-Hur” (1959), “Titanic” (1997) and “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King” (2003), all of which won Best Picture. The only other film to notch double digits wins is the musical classic “West Side Story” (1961) with 10.

The next closest are “Gigi” (1958), “The Last Emperor” (1987) and “The English Patient” (1996) with nine wins apiece, while multiple films have won eight: “Gone with the Wind” (1939), “From Here to Eternity” (1953), “On the Waterfront” (1954), “My Fair Lady” (1964), “Cabaret” (1972), “Gandhi” (1982), “Amadeus” (1984) and “Slumdog Millionaire” (2012).

Which films earned the most Oscar nominations?

“All About Eve” (1950), “Titanic” (1997) and “La La Land” (2016) are tied for the most total nominations with 14 each. “All About Eve” ultimately won six, “Titanic” ultimately won 11, and “La La Land” ultimately won six, but while “All About Eve” and “Titanic” both won Best Picture, “La La Land” remains the most-nominated film ever to lose the top prize. Overrated?

Which film won Best Picture after the wrong winner was announced?

No one will ever forget the night that “Moonlight” (2016) shockingly, yet deservedly won Best Picture after presenters Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway accidentally read the wrong winner due to an infamous envelope gaffe that was endlessly dissected in the weeks to come. When the record was corrected two-and-a-half minutes later, Barry Jenkins took the stage as “Moonlight” became the lowest-budget film ever to win Best Picture.

Which movie earned the most nominations without winning any?

This dubious honor is shared by Herbert Ross’ “The Turning Point” (1977) and Steven Spielberg’s “The Color Purple” (1985), which each entered their respective ceremonies with 11 nominations but walked away empty-handed. You can only imagine the filmmakers’ wave of excitement going in, only for their balloons to be completely deflated on the way out.

Which is the only franchise to win Best Picture twice?

While “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King” (2003) pulled off a Best Picture win as a sequel, none of its other installments took the top prize. That leaves Francis Ford Coppola’s gangster masterpiece as the only franchise to win the top prize twice for “The Godfather” (1972) and “The Godfather: Part II” (1974). Years later, “The Godfather: Part III” (1990) was also nominated for Best Picture, but it lost to “Dances with Wolves” (1990) in a year that should have crowned “Goodfellas” (1990).

Who has the most Oscar wins and nominations?

Walt Disney leads the all-time list with 22 wins and 59 nominations for his array of cartoon shorts, animated features and nature documentaries. John Williams is currently in second place with 52 nominations, including this year for composing the score to “Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker.”

Who has won Best Actress the most?

Katharine Hepburn won Best Actress a whopping four times for “Morning Glory” (1933), “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” (1967), “The Lion in Winter” (1968) and “On Golden Pond” (1981), though ironically not for her four best movies: “Bringing Up Baby” (1938), “The Philadelphia Story” (1940), “Adam’s Rib” (1949) and “The African Queen” (1951).

Meryl Streep leads with 21 total nominations, including three wins: Best Supporting Actress for “Kramer vs. Kramer” (1979) and Best Actress for both “Sophie’s Choice” (1982) and “The Iron Lady” (2011). Ingrid Bergman also has three wins, earning Best Actress twice for “Gaslight” (1944) and “Anastasia” (1956) before bagging her third Oscar for Best Supporting Actress in “Murder on the Orient Express” (1974).

Several others have won Best Actress twice: Bette Davis for “Dangerous” (1935) and “Jezebel” (1938), Luise Rainer for “The Great Ziegfeld” (1936) and “The Good Earth” (1937), Vivien Leigh for “Gone with the Wind” (1939) and “A Streetcar Named Desire” (1951), Olivia de Havilland for “To Each His Own” (1946) and “The Heiress” (1949), and Elizabeth Taylor for “Butterfield 8” (1960) and “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” (1966).

More recent double Best Actress winners include Glenda Jackson for “Women in Love” (1970) and “A Touch of Class” (1973), Jane Fonda for “Klute” (1971) and “Coming Home” (1978), Sally Field for “Norma Rae” (1979) and “Places in the Heart” (1984), Jodie Foster for “The Accused” (1988) and “The Silence of the Lambs” (1991), Hilary Swank for “Boys Don’t Cry” (1999) and “Million Dollar Baby” (2004), and Frances McDormand for “Fargo” (1996) and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” (2017).

Who has won Best Actor the most?

Daniel Day-Lewis has won Best Actor three times for “My Left Foot” (1989), “There Will Be Blood” (2007) and “Lincoln” (2012). Jack Nicholson also has three Oscars to his name: Best Actor twice for “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975) and “As Good As It Gets” (1997), as well as Best Supporting Actor for “Terms of Endearment” (1983).

Other double Best Actor winners include Spencer Tracey for “Captain Courageous” (1937) and “Boys Town” (1938), Frederic March for “Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde” (1931) and “The Best Years of Our Lives” (1946), Gary Cooper for “Sergeant York” (1941) and “High Noon” (1952), Marlon Brando for “On the Waterfront” (1954) and “The Godfather” (1972), Dustin Hoffman for “Kramer vs. Kramer” (1979) and “Rain Man” (1988), Tom Hanks for “Philadelphia” (1993) and “Forrest Gump” (1994) and Sean Penn for “Mystic River” (2003) and “Milk” (2008).

Who was the first African American to win Best Actor?

After Hattie McDaniel’s groundbreaking win for Best Supporting Actress in “Gone with the Wind” (1939), Sidney Poitier made history as the first African American to win Best Actor for “Lilies of the Field” (1963). He should have won again for his iconic role as Virgil Tibbs in “In the Heat of the Night” (1967), but his nomination instead went to co-star Rod Steiger. The feat tragically — and tellingly — wasn’t repeated until Denzel Washington won Best Actor for “Training Day” (2001), cementing Denzel’s legacy after previously winning Best Supporting Actor for “Glory” (1989).

Which director has won the most Oscars?

John Ford has won Best Director four times for “The Informer” (1935), “The Grapes of Wrath” (1940), “How Green Was My Valley” (1941) and “The Quiet Man” (1952). Ironically, none of them were westerns, which he pioneered with “Stagecoach” (1939), “My Darling Clementine” (1946), “The Searchers” (1956) and “The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance” (1962).

Second place is a tie between William Wyler and Frank Capra, who each won Best Director three times. Wyler won for “Mrs. Miniver” (1942), “The Best Years of Our Lives” (1946) and “Ben-Hur” (1959), but not for “Roman Holiday” (1953) or “Funny Girl” (1968). Capra won for “It Happened One Night” (1934), “Mr. Deeds Goes to Town” (1936) and “You Can’t Take it With You” (1938), but ironically not for “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington” (1939) or “It’s a Wonderful Life” (1946).

Let’s also remember that Billy Wilder earned six Oscars and Francis Ford Coppola earned five, but theirs came across a variety of categories for writing, directing and producing. Wilder’s six wins came for “The Lost Weekend” (1946), “Sunset Blvd.” (1950) and “The Apartment” (1960), but ironically not for “Double Indemnity” (1944) or “Some Like it Hot” (1959). Coppola’s five wins came for “Patton” (1970), “The Godfather” (1972) and “The Godfather: Part II” (1974), but ironically not for “The Conversation” (1974) or “Apocalypse Now” (1979).

How many times did Alfred Hitchcock win Best Director?

Zero. That’s right, arguably the greatest director in all of film history never won the directing prize, despite a prolific body of work that includes “Notorious” (1946), “Rear Window” (1954), “Vertigo” (1958), “North By Northwest” (1959), “Psycho” (1960) and “The Birds” (1963). However, his first Hollywood picture “Rebecca” (1940) did win Best Picture.

Who directed his own father and his own daughter to an Oscar?

John Huston directed his father Walter Huston to an Oscar for “The Treasure of the Sierra Madre” (1948), for which he also won Best Director. He later directed his daughter Anjelica Huston to an Oscar for “Prizzi’s Honor” (1985). I dare you to watch the above video without smiling.

Which movie first won the Oscar for Best Animated Film?

The first winner of Best Animated Film was “Shrek” (2001). The category did not previously exist, so it was practically invented for the DreamWorks hit. However, “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” (1937) won an honorary Oscar (and seven little statuettes) as “a significant screen innovation which has charmed millions and pioneered a great new entertainment field.” Other Disney films have also won Oscars in music categories.

Which Broadway star got the sweetest Oscar revenge?

Julie Andrews won a Tony as Eliza Doolittle in Broadway’s “My Fair Lady,” but she was deemed not famous enough to star in the 1964 film version. Instead, the studio went with Audrey Hepburn, whom Andrews defeated for Best Actress thanks to “Mary Poppins” (1964). The rest is history.

How did Richard Attenborough make up to Steven Spielberg?

When the late Richard Attenborough’s biopic “Gandhi” won Best Picture over Steven Spielberg’s blockbuster “E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial” (1982), Attenborough ultimately admitted that “E.T.” was the better movie. How did he make it up to Spielberg? By agreeing to star as the theme park owner in “Jurassic Park” (1993). That’s right, “E.T. phone home” eventually became “We have a t-rex.” I guess some things work out for the best.

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The Players

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In Oscar history, 2 films tied for the record of the most nominations without a single win. Both The Turning Point (1977) and The Color Purple (1985) received 11 Oscar nominations but won not a single Academy Award.

Twice in Academy Awards history, 2 sisters have been nominated for the same category during the same year. For the 1941 Academy Awards, sisters Joan Fontaine (Suspicion) and Olivia de Havilland (Hold Back the Dawn) were both nominated for the Best Actress award. Joan Fontaine won the Oscar. Jealousy between the two sisters continued to escalate after this and the 2 have been estranged for decades.

At the 1966 Academy Awards, a similar thing happened. Sisters Lynn Redgrave (Georgy Girl) and Vanessa Redgrave (Morgan: A Suitable Case for Treatment) were both nominated for the Best Actress award. However, this time, neither of the sisters won.


Watch the video: Academy Awards, 1960 (May 2022).