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USS Quincy (CA-39)

USS Quincy (CA-39)

USS Quincy (CA-39)

Pre-War and Introduction

USS Quincy (CA-39) was a New Orleans class heavy cruiser that served with the Neutrality Patrol in the Atlantic and fought at Guadalcanal, before being sunk during the battle of Savo Island of 9 August 1942. Quincy earned one battle star during World War II.

The previous pair of ships, Tuscaloosa (CA-37) and San Francisco (CA-38) had been given a lighter 8in gun and a smaller turret, saving around 40 tons. This weight was used to increase the amount of barbette armour, but this turned out to bring them very close to the treaty limits. In order to counter this Quincy and Vincennes had some armour removed, especially in the barbettes.

San Francisco (CA-38), Quincy (CA-39) and Vincennes (CA-44) were the first US cruisers to be fitted with emergency diesel generators.

The Quincy was laid down in November 1933, launched in June 1935 and commissioned on 9 June 1936. She joined Cruiser Division 8 of the Atlantic Fleet. Her first operational duty came a few weeks later, when on 20 July she was ordered to join the American naval force protecting US interests during the Spanish Civil War. She reached Malaga on 27 July and formed part of an international fleet that included the German ships Deutschland, Admiral Graf Spee and Admiral Scheer. During her time in Spain she transported 490 refugees to Marseilles and Villefranche, but she was replaced by the Raleigh on 27 September.

Her first deployment had been so rushed that she hadn’t yet undergone acceptance trials. These took place in March 1937, and she was then allocated to Cruiser Division 7, based at Pearl Harbor, where she arrived on 10 May. She was just in time to take part in a Pacific Fleet tactical exercise. In 1938 she took part in Fleet Problem XIX, off Hawaii. She was then overhauled at Mare Island Navy Yard, before at the start of January 1939 she was ordered to join the Atlantic Fleet. She arrived in time to take part in Fleet Problem XX in February 1939. In April-June she made a goodwill tour of South American then in July-August she carried out three training cruises for reservists.

Wartime Service

After the outbreak of the Second World War the Quincy took part in the Neutrality Patrol in the North Atlantic. In the spring of 1940 she was overhauled again, then took part in a lengthy tour of Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina that lasted until September. She then carried out three more training cruises in October-December 1940.

In early 1941 Quincy took part in Atlantic Fleet manoeuvres. In April-June she was with Task Group 2 (USS Wasp), in the mid-Atlantic and from June-July she served alongside the Yorktown. In late July she was part of Task Group 16, the naval force that helped take over the protection of Iceland. She carried out a patrol in the Denmark Straits (21-24 September), then in late October sailed for Newfoundland, protecting a convoy. She then moved to Cape Town and escorted a convoy back to Trinidad, arriving on 29 December 1941. She was back at Iceland in January-March 1942, before returning to New York for an overhaul that lasted from March to May 1942.

After this overhaul the Quincy was sent to the Pacific, reaching San Diego on 19 June 1942. She became the flagship of Rear Admiral Norman R. Scott, Commander Cruisers, and part of Task Force 18. This force was allocated to the invasion of Guadalcanal. The Quincy took part in a pre-invasion bombardment of Lunga Point, then supported the Marine landings on 7 August.

The Japanese responded in force, sending a surface fleet to attack the American shipping. This fleet caught the Americans by surprise early on 9 August (battle of Savo Island). Three of the New Orleans class ships, Quincy, Astoria and Vincennes, formed the Northern Escort Force off Guadalcanal. They were attacked by the Japanese just before 2am on 9 August. Vincennes was first to be hit, and was soon dead on the water. Quincy was second in line, and was hit by heavy Japanese gun fire. All of her guns were knocked out and a few minutes after coming under attack she was on fire. Finally the Astoria was hit by the fifth Japanese salvo aimed at her and was out of control by the time the Japanese withdrew. All three of the damaged cruisers sank. Quncy was hit by at least 54 shells and three torpedoes and suffered the loss of 370 of her crew.

Wartime Modification

All members of the New Orleans class received quad 1.1in gun mounts early in 1942, with two on the quarterdeck and two at the same level as the chart house. They also got search radar and had the foremast reduced in height. Quincy was also give twelve single 20mm guns.

Displacement (standard)

10,136t

Displacement (loaded)

12,463t

Top Speed

32.7kts

Range

10,000nm at 15kts

Armour – belt

5in to 3.25in over 0.75in STS

- over machinery

2.25in

- magazines

4in-3in side
2.25in above

- barbettes

6in-5in

- turrets

6in face
2.25in roof
1.5in side

Length

588ft oa

Armaments

Nine 8in/55 guns (three 3-gun turrets)
Eight 5in/25 guns (eight single positions)
Eight 0.5in guns (eight single positions)
Four aircraft

Crew complement

868

Laid Down

15 November 1933

Launched

19 June 1935

Completed

9 June 1936

Lost

9 August 1942


USS Quincy (CA-39)

Quincy, the second ship to carry the name, was laid down by Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation's Fore River Shipyard in Quincy, Massachusetts on 15 November 1933, launched on 19 June 1935, sponsored by Mrs. Catherine Adams-Morgan, wife of Henry S. Morgan, and commissioned at Boston on 9 June 1936, Captain William Faulkner Amsden in command. [4]

The New Orleans-class cruisers were the last U.S. cruisers built to the specifications and standards of the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922. Such ships, with a limit of 10,000 tons standard displacement and 8-inch caliber main guns may be referred to as "treaty cruisers." Originally classified a light cruiser when she was authorized, because of her thin armor, she was reclassified a heavy cruiser, because of her 8-inch guns. The term "heavy cruiser" was not defined until the London Naval Treaty in 1930. This ship and Vincennes were a slightly improved version of the New Orleans-class design.


Sailors' Stories: Dan Galvin

Update: I am saddened to report that Daniel Galvin passed away January 28, 2016. He was given a full military funeral. We owe a debt of gratitude to Daniel, his family and the men and women like him who served or currently serve our country and fight for our freedoms.

Dan Galvin's story, from August 2009, was discovered as a result of an e-mail from the daughter of a crew member of the USS Ellet, DD-398. The Ellet's crew rescued the survivors of the USS Quincy CA-39 that was sunk by Japanese forces at the battle of Savo Island in WWII. Dan Galvin lost three hundred eighty nine of his shipmates that night.

The Salute of a Survivor, By Kevin Cullen, Boston Globe Columnist | August 10, 2009

When he was 19 years old, Dan Galvin joined the Navy because he wanted to see the world. A year later, the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor and he got to see the world at war.

He was 21, aboard the USS Quincy, when she sailed into the Battle of Guadalcanal.

Sometime after midnight, as August 8th turned into August 9th, the Quincy and two other cruisers, the USS Vincennes and the USS Astoria, were sailing off Savo Island. Galvin was at his battle station in Sky Forward, atop the ship, when he saw something in the darkness.

He realized they were Japanese warships just as the sky exploded.

&ldquoTheir first salvos were star shells,&rsquo&rsquo he said. &ldquoThey illuminate the target.&rsquo&rsquo

The eerie beauty of the star shells gave way to deafening shelling. Everything around Dan Galvin exploded. The bridge blew up and he knew his captain was dead. He slid down the ladder from Sky Forward. Torpedoes slammed into the hull.

&ldquoSomething hit me in the chest. It was pitch black. I didn't know what the hell it was. But I grabbed hold of it. It was a life preserver. Somebody was handing them out, and I got one, by chance.&rsquo&rsquo

Within minutes, the ship was listing 45 degrees. Then she rolled over. Dan Galvin, a kid from Melrose, was running down the hull on the starboard side, hearing his feet ping on the metal.

&ldquoI was probably the last guy off,&rsquo&rsquo he said.

The Quincy sank in less than 10 minutes. The Vincennes and the Astoria were sunk, too.

It was Clyde Bolton, a friend from Concord, N.H., bobbing in the water.

&ldquoCome over here!&rsquo&rsquo Clyde Bolton yelled.

&ldquoYou come over here,&rsquo&rsquo Dan Galvin yelled back as he struggled to stay afloat.

They were no more than 50 feet away from each other in the water, and before you knew it, Clyde Bolton, badly burned, slipped beneath the surface.

It was dawn and Dan Galvin had been in the water for five hours before he struggled up a rope ladder onto the USS Ellet. He was so exhausted, his clothes so waterlogged, that he had to be dragged the last few feet. He was numb even before he found out that nearly half of the 800 men on the Quincy were killed.

He learned that an admiral had abandoned them, that an Allied vessel had failed to warn them of the seven approaching Japanese ships. The American ships didn&rsquot have torpedoes. The sailors didn&rsquot have dog tags. They were a peacetime Navy caught in a war.

Dan Galvin survived the war. He went on to marry, raise five kids, and have a good career, a good life.

And yet, a piece of him is still bobbing in the South Pacific.

&ldquoThat post-traumatic stress, I don&rsquot think I had that. But I had guilt. Survivor&rsquos guilt, whatever you want to call it. I shouldn&rsquot be here.&rsquo&rsquo

Clyde Bolton got the ship job Galvin had wanted. And Bolton died. Ralph Beebe took the job below deck that Galvin had turned down. And died. Dan Galvin floated with a life preserver while men sank around him.

&ldquoI should have gone over to Clyde when he called me,&rsquo&rsquo he said, sitting at his kitchen table in Hanover, looking out the window at a memory. &ldquoI think about him every day. I wish I swam over to him.&rsquo&rsquo

Yesterday, 67 years to the day that Dan Galvin lived while so many around him died, he did what he does every Aug. 9. He put on his sailor&rsquos uniform from 1942, and he stepped onto his front porch, and he read the names of each of the 389 men who went down with the Quincy.

Sometimes he gets through the list without crying. But every year it gets harder.

&ldquoI worry,&rsquo&rsquo Dan Galvin said. &ldquoI worry that when I&rsquom gone, no one will remember these men.&rsquo&rsquo


CA - USS Quincy (CA-39)

class: New Orleans
shipyard: Bethlehem Steel Corporation,Fore Fiver Shipyard,Quincy,Massachusetts
construction started: November 15, 1933
launched: 19 January 1935
taken into service: 24 February 1937

sunk: 9 August 1942
where: at the island of Savo

length: 588.3' 179,31 m
width: 61.25' 18,66 m
draught: 23' 7,01 m

Displacement
standard: 9 950 tonnes
maximum: 11 515 tons

Drive
boilers: 8 Babcock & Wilcox
turbines: 4 Westinghouse
performance: 107 000 shp
range: 10 000 n. miles / 15 knots
speed: 32.7 knots

Armour
hips: 1.5" - 5" 38,1 - 127 mm
deck: 2" - 5" of 50.8 - 127 mm
barbetty: 5.5" 139.7 mm
towers
..front: 5" - 6" 127 - 152 mm
..sides: 3" 76 mm
..ass: 3" 76 mm
veliteská tower: 8" 203 mm

Armament
9 x 203 mm 8"/55 ( 3 x III )
8 x 127 mm 5"/25 ( 8 x I )

anti-aircraft weaponry
8 x 12,7 mm 0.50" M2 ( 8 x I )
1942
16 x 28 mm ( 4 x IV )
12 x 20 mm ( 12 x I )


USS Quincy (CA-39) - History

USS Quincy (CA-39) was a New Orleans class heavy cruiser that served with the Neutrality Patrol in the Atlantic and fought at Guadalcanal, before being sunk during the battle of Savo Island of 9 August 1942. Quincy earned one battle star during World War II.

The previous pair of ships, Tuscaloosa (CA-37) and San Francisco (CA-38) had been given a lighter 8in gun and a smaller turret, saving around 40 tons. This weight was used to increase the amount of barbette armour, but this turned out to bring them very close to the treaty limits. In order to counter this Quincy and Vincennes had some armour removed, especially in the barbettes.


USS Quincy (CA-39) at
New York, 29 May 1942

San Francisco (CA-38), Quincy (CA-39) and Vincennes (CA-44) were the first US cruisers to be fitted with emergency diesel generators.

The Quincy was laid down in November 1933, launched in June 1935 and commissioned on 9 June 1936. She joined Cruiser Division 8 of the Atlantic Fleet. Her first operational duty came a few weeks later, when on 20 July she was ordered to join the American naval force protecting US interests during the Spanish Civil War. She reached Malaga on 27 July and formed part of an international fleet that included the German ships Deutschland, Admiral Graf Spee and Admiral Scheer.  During her time in Spain she transported 490 refugees to Marseilles and Villefranche, but she was replaced by the Raleigh on 27 September.

Her first deployment had been so rushed that she hadn’t yet undergone acceptance trials. These took place in March 1937, and she was then allocated to Cruiser Division 7, based at Pearl Harbor, where she arrived on 10 May. She was just in time to take part in a Pacific Fleet tactical exercise. In 1938 she took part in Fleet Problem XIX, off Hawaii. She was then overhauled at Mare Island Navy Yard, before at the start of January 1939 she was ordered to join the Atlantic Fleet. She arrived in time to take part in Fleet Problem XX in February 1939. In April-June she made a goodwill tour of South American then in July-August she carried out three training cruises for reservists.

Wartime Service

After the outbreak of the Second World War the Quincy took part in the Neutrality Patrol in the North Atlantic. In the spring of 1940 she was overhauled again, then took part in a lengthy tour of Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina that lasted until September. She then carried out three more training cruises in October-December 1940.

In early 1941 Quincy took part in Atlantic Fleet manoeuvres. In April-June she was with Task Group 2 (USS Wasp), in the mid-Atlantic and from June-July she served alongside the Yorktown. In late July she was part of Task Group 16, the naval force that helped take over the protection of Iceland. She carried out a patrol in the Denmark Straits (21-24 September), then in late October sailed for Newfoundland, protecting a convoy. She then moved to Cape Town and escorted a convoy back to Trinidad, arriving on 29 December 1941. She was back at Iceland in January-March 1942, before returning to New York for an overhaul that lasted from March to May 1942.

After this overhaul the Quincy was sent to the Pacific, reaching San Diego on 19 June 1942. She became the flagship of Rear Admiral Norman R. Scott, Commander Cruisers, and part of Task Force 18. This force was allocated to the invasion of Guadalcanal. The Quincy took part in a pre-invasion bombardment of Lunga Point, then supported the Marine landings on 7 August.

The Japanese responded in force, sending a surface fleet to attack the American shipping. This fleet caught the Americans by surprise early on 9 August (battle of Savo Island). Three of the New Orleans class ships, Quincy, Astoria and Vincennes, formed the Northern Escort Force off Guadalcanal. They were attacked by the Japanese just before 2am on 9 August. Vincennes was first to be hit, and was soon dead on the water. Quincy was second in line, and was hit by heavy Japanese gun fire. All of her guns were knocked out and a few minutes after coming under attack she was on fire. Finally the Astoria was hit by the fifth Japanese salvo aimed at her and was out of control by the time the Japanese withdrew. All three of the damaged cruisers sank. Quncy was hit by at least 54 shells and three torpedoes and suffered the loss of 370 of her crew.

Wartime Modification

All members of the New Orleans class received quad 1.1in gun mounts early in 1942, with two on the quarterdeck and two at the same level as the chart house. They also got search radar and had the foremast reduced in height. Quincy was also give twelve single 20mm guns.

Loss at the Battle of Savo Island

While on patrol in the channel between Florida Island and Savo Island, in the early hours of 9 August, Quincy was attacked by a large Japanese naval force during the Battle of Savo Island


Quincy caught in Japanese searchlights, moments before sinking off Savo Island with great loss of life, on 9 August 1942

Quincy, along with sister ships USS Astoria (CA-34) and USS Vincennes (CA-44), had seen aircraft flares dropped over other ships in the task force, and had just sounded general quarters and was coming alert when the searchlights from the Japanese column came on. Quincy’s captain, Samuel N. Moore, gave the order to commence firing, but the gun crews were not ready. Within a few minutes, Quincy was caught in a crossfire between AobaFurutaka, and Tenryū, and was hit heavily and set afire. Quincy’s captain ordered his cruiser to charge towards the eastern Japanese column, but as she turned to do so Quincy was hit by two torpedoes from Tenryū, causing severe damage. Quincy managed to fire a few main gun salvos, one of which hit Chōkai’s chart room 6 meters (20 ft) from Admiral Mikawa and killed or wounded 36 men, although Mikawa was not injured. At 02:10, incoming shells killed or wounded almost all of Quincy’s bridge crew, including the captain. At 02:16, the cruiser was hit by a torpedo from Aoba, and the ship's remaining guns were silenced. Quincy’s assistant gunnery officer, sent to the bridge to ask for instructions, reported on what he found:

"When I reached the bridge level, I found it a shambles of dead bodies with only three or four people still standing. In the Pilot House itself the only person standing was the signalman at the wheel who was vainly endeavoring to check the ship's swing to starboard to bring her to port. On questioning him I found out that the Captain, who at that time was laying  near the wheel, had instructed him to beach the ship and he was trying to head for Savo Island, distant some four miles (6 km) on the port quarter. I stepped to the port side of the Pilot House, and looked out to find the island and noted that the ship was heeling rapidly to port, sinking by the bow. At that instant the Captain straightened up and fell back, apparently dead, without having uttered any sound other than a moan."

Quincy sustained many direct hits which left 370 men dead and 167 wounded. She sank, bow first, at 02:38, being the first ship sunk in the area which was later known as Ironbottom Sound.

Rediscovery

Quincy's wreck was discovered and explored by Robert Ballard and his crew in July and August of 1992. Quincy sits upright in roughly 2,000 feet (610 m) of water. Her bow is missing forward of her number 1 turret, both forward turrets are trained to starboard, with turret 1 featuring a jammed gun, and one of turret 2's guns burst. Of the superstructure, the bridge is heavily damaged but intact, both funnels are missing, and the float plane hangar completely collapsed. Quincy's stern is bent upwards aft of the number 3 turret, and heavily damaged by implosions.


A GOOD AGE: USS Quincy survivor in Hanover helps families of men lost at sea

As Memorial Day approaches, Daniel H. Galvin, 90, of Hanover is reaching out to help families remember 389 shipmates who were lost when the USS Quincy-CA 39 was sunk in 1942. Galvin, who survived the tragedy,  is working with people from Virginia and California, sharing information and creating living memorials.

In March, Francis ``Skip'' Gallagher of Springfield, Va., read a Patriot Ledger article, ``A Battle-tested Survivor Turns 90,'' about Navy veteran Daniel H. Galvin of Hanover. Galvin served in the U.S. Navy from 1940 to 1952, and was on board the USS Quincy-CA 39 when it was sunk by the Japanese at Guadalcanal on Aug. 9, 1942.

In his 91st year, Galvin is still keeping alive  memories of his 389 lost shipmates.

Gallagher emailed: "What Daniel Galvin has been doing is very important to me. My uncle, Francis P. Gallagher, was one of the men who went down with the USS Quincy. He was a graduate of Yale.

"Before my uncle left for sea, he asked my mother, pregnant at the time, if anything happened to him, would she name a child after him. I was born Aug. 31, 1942, at the Chelsea Naval Shipyard and named Francis Gallagher in honor of my uncle’s request. I have collected letters and other family information about my uncle’s life and death.''

Gallagher asked me to contact Galvin for him, which I did.

A month later, Gallagher emailed:  "Daniel and I had a nice talk about the USS Quincy and my uncle Frank. He sent me information about a book, ‘The History of the USS Quincy CA-39,’ by Grady F. Mesimer.''

Gallagher sent Galvin family documents about his uncle and the USS Quincy.

"Dear Friend Skip,'' Galvin wrote back, ``Your package arrived this morning. Something that caught my eye was a photograph in the Bridgeport Telegraph with the name John  J. Porcs.

"I have not thought of him in all of these 69 years since the sinking of CA-39. I had asked him, a petty officer, if he would take a liberty with me, a BOOT. Surprisingly, he agreed and he showed me the ropes in making a memorable liberty.

"Bob Hope used to sing ‘Thanks For The Memory’ and that is my song to you!''

This week, Gallagher sent Galvin a copy of a letter President Ford wrote to him in 1995 about his uncle.

Gallagher says he ``will always think of Daniel Galvin now,'' along with his uncle and namesake, and ``was very lucky to make this connection, my first with a person that was there'' aboard the USS Quincy.

As Memorial Day approaches, we honor people like Galvin, a big-hearted man who likes to fill in information for those who have lost someone – ``whether it was in battle or with the passage of time.''

Kindness is a two-way street. At a USS Quincy-CA 39 families’ reunion last year, Galvin met Dr. Eileen Natuzzi, the niece of William Moore Stack, only 17 when he went down

Galvin shared with her his appreciation for the specialized military work her uncle had been learning. He learned that in memory of her uncle, Natuzzi has brought medical missions to the Guadalcanal Islands and established an educational fund. She, Galvin and others are working to create other "Living Memorials'' for lost veterans through humanitarian aid and better medical treatment.

Natuzzi learned that Galvin continues to harbor regrets about not doing more to help his best friend during the ship’s sinking 70 years ago.

"On one of her medical missions,'' he said, ``she went to the spot where the USS Quincy went down, floated a wreath on the water and asked forgiveness for me in my friend’s name. She is a very kind person.

"Here I am ,in my second marriage (of 16 years after being widowed) and I believe that sharing is the essence of love.”


USS Quincy (CA-39) - History

My Dad, Daniel H. Galvin, Jr. is a survivor of the sinking of the USS Quincy CA39. He will be 87 next month, he has a vivid memory of 'that night'. please email me as it will be easier to get to your question. He remembers faces more that names if you can send me a pic that would be great.

thanks
Catherine Galvin Doucette

Hello Catherine, Thank you for being so generous regarding the USS Quincy.you responded to me in 2006,bless you.It seems to me that your dad is a great resource.why is it that I can not find A crew list.If there are no rosters how do they know who was where.If you know how to optain such A list please let me know. Respectfully yours, JIM

HI
I did some research and came up with a telephone number and address to search the USN archives for the 'muster roll' as it is called. Good Luck..I will also as my dad, Daniel Galvin, if he has a list. will take some time to locate as he has just moved and it is I am sure in a box
Catherine


***The Textual Reference Branch, National Archives, Washington, DC 20374 (202-501-5671) holds copies of the deck logs from 1801 through December 1940 , as well as microfilm copies of the muster rolls through 1938.
The Textual Reference Branch, National Archives and Records Administration, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001 has custody of the deck logs from 1 January 1941 through 1961, as well as microfilm copies of the muster rolls from 1939 through 1966. In some cases in the 1950's and 1960's, a list of the officers is included with the muster rolls. The Textual Reference Branch at College Park also has custody of the Bureau of Naval Personnel Casualty Files, which have the official list of Navy casualties for each World War II action. By using the list of officers in the deck logs and the muster rolls, one can compile a list of the crew. Then by using the crew list and the list of Casualties the names of the survivors of a World War II ship or vessel can be created.****

Hello Catherine,
My uncle, Leonard Joslin, is a survivor. He's going to be celebrating his 91st birthday in a few months and he is still very active. His brother, Donald Joslin, reported on board the Quincy in 1938 and spent 2 1/2 years as an electrician. He is also alive and well. Leonard was a signalman and he is pictured on page 109 of the History of the USS Quincy by Grady S. Mesimer. He's the one holding the flags in the signalman picture. I was lucky to find a copy of this book on ebay for a very reasonable price. There is another one listed at this time but is priced at $249.00. Your Dad and my uncle were picked up by the same ship per this book. Kent

Hi Kent
Thanks for the information! I am printing out your email and I will forward it to my Dad, Daniel Galvin.
Daniel contributed to the USS Quincy book. It would be wonderful if your Uncles and Daniel could communicate with each other. Dad doesn't have a computer yet but he could telephone. Let me know ok?
Thanks
Catherine

My grandfather Tom Cooper is still around, he is 91. He was on the ship from it's first run until nov. of 41 when he got out of the navy.

HI Jim
Just wanted to let you know I saw your email. My Dad, Daniel Galvin may know of him. I will talk to him.. Catherine

hi, just wanted to ask you if you known my uncle francies Suggitt? i wasnt born yet when he was kidded on the quency 39 i have been digging up info did you know him? i have a postcard he wrote to my dad it was a month before he was comming home, Doris

HI, FIRST OF ALL I AM SORRY FOR UR DAD TO GO THROUGH ALL THAT WAR STUFF, MY DADS BROTHER FRANCIES SUGGITT WAS ON THAT SHIP QUENCY 39 HE SUNK I DIDNT KNOW HIM BUT I BEEN RESERCHING ON THIS SHIP FOR A WHILE, WOULD UR DAD KNOWN HIM? I HAVE A POSTCARD OF THE SHIP FRANCIES SENT TO DAD, SAID HE WAS COMMING HOME IN ONE MONTH DORIS BRADLEY


クインシー (CA-39)

就役後、大西洋艦隊第8巡洋戦隊に配属されたクインシーは、1936年7月20日に地中海への派遣を命じられ、スペイン内戦におけるアメリカ合衆国の権益保護任務に就く。7月26日にジブラルタル海峡を通過し、27日にマラガに到着した。スペイン海域でクインシーはドイツ戦艦ドイッチュラント、アドミラル・グラーフ・シュペー、アドミラル・シェーアを含む国際救助艦隊に所属し作戦活動に従事した。クインシーは490名の難民をマルセイユおよびヴィルフランシュに送り届けた。その後、ローリー (USS Raleigh, CL-7) とその任務を交替した。

クインシーは大西洋艦隊の演習および上陸部隊の演習をプエルトリコのクレブラ島沖で1941年2月3日から4月1日まで行う。ヨーロッパでの戦闘が激化すると、クインシーは第2任務部隊へ配属され、空母ワスプ (USS Wasp, CV-7) と共に中部大西洋で4月26日から6月6日まで中立パトロールを行う。その後空母ヨークタウン (USS Yorktown, CV-5) と共に第28任務部隊と活動し、7月14日に母港に帰還した。

第二次世界大戦 編集

第一次ソロモン海戦と最期 編集

上陸した海兵隊部隊の護衛にあたる水上部隊の司令官 ヴィクター・クラッチレー (英語版) 少将(オーストラリア海軍)は、輸送船団を守るためルンガ沖に至る各水路に巡洋艦を複数配置し、各艦は正方形の運動を行って哨戒して、怪しい艦船を発見すれば通報の上反撃にでる態勢を取った [2] 。クインシーはヴィンセンス (USS Vincennes, CA-44) およびアストリア (USS Astoria, CA-34) と同じグループに属し、サボ島とフロリダ諸島間の海域にいた。

8月8日夜、三川軍一中将率いる第八艦隊の重巡洋艦と軽巡洋艦、駆逐艦がサボ島西方からガダルカナル島沖に入ってきた。三川中将の艦隊はサボ島西方を進み、シカゴ (USS Chicago, CA-29)、オーストラリア重巡洋艦キャンベラ (HMAS Canberra, D33) および駆逐艦パターソン (USS Patterson, DD-392)、バッグレイ (USS Bagley, DD-386) のグループに対して砲雷撃を行い、キャンベラは大破し、シカゴは艦首部に魚雷が1本命中して戦線離脱した。このグループは警報を発しなかったか [3] 、他のグループの受信状態が芳しくなかったか [4] 、ともかく異変を周囲に知らしめることはなかった。三川艦隊は些細なミスから2つのグループに分離し北上。どちらのグループもクインシーらがいるグループに迫りつつあった。

クインシーはヴィンセンスとともに三川艦隊からのサーチライトの照射を受け、状況が全くつかめていなかった両艦は、味方からの照射だと勘違いして味方識別信号を送るよう指示を出した [5] 。これに対し、三川艦隊は一斉砲撃で応答した。状況を理解しつつあったヴィンセンスが反撃の砲撃を行ったものの、2つのグループからの砲雷撃に挟み撃ちにされ破壊された。クインシーは鳥海からの砲撃を受け、鳥海の砲弾はクインシーの艦載機に命中。当時燃料を満載していた艦載機は炎上し、砲弾も誘爆を起こして三川艦隊の格好の標的となる。クインシーはヴィンセンスとともに北に逃げたが、やがて西側を進んでいた古鷹、天龍、夕張からも攻撃された [6] 。天龍と夕張は魚雷をクインシーとヴィンセンスに向けて発射した。クインシーは鳥海らのグループの間を砲撃しながら突き抜ける策に出始めたところだったが [7] 、魚雷が缶室に命中。断末魔を迎えたクインシーは捨て身の砲撃を行い、これは鳥海の海図室に命中した [7] 。やがてクインシーは左舷側に大きく傾いた後、横転して沈没していった。クインシーはこの戦闘で艦長を含む370名が戦死し、167名が負傷した。クインシーはアイアンボトム・サウンドとして知られた海域に沈んでいる。なお、作家丹羽文雄はこの当時、報道班員として鳥海に乗艦し、クインシー最後の反撃を目撃している [7] 。


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Kurz nachdem die Quincy der Cruiser Division 8 (CruDiv8 Atlantische Flotte) zugewiesen wurde, wurde sie am 20. Juli 1936 zu ihrem ersten Einsatz ins Mittelmeer berufen, um die amerikanischen Interessen in Spanien während des Spanischen Bürgerkriegs zu schützen. Am 26. Juli passierte die Quincy die Straße von Gibraltar und erreichte einen Tag später Málaga. Während seines Einsatzes bildete das Schiff zusammen mit der Deutschland, der Admiral Scheer und der Admiral Graf Spee eine internationale Rettungsflotte. In dieser Zeit rettete die Quincy insgesamt 490 Flüchtlinge nach Marseille und Villefranche-sur-Mer (Frankreich), bis sie am 27. September durch die Raleigh abgelöst wurde.

Am 5. Oktober kehrte die Quincy in den Boston Naval Shipyard zurück, um sich auf die endgültigen Annahmeverfahren vorzubereiten, die vom 15. bis 18. März 1937 stattfanden. Am 12. April machte sich das Schiff auf den Weg Richtung Pazifik, um sich der Cruiser Division 7 anzuschließen. Sie durchquerte den Panamakanal vom 23. bis 27. April und erreichte Pearl Harbor am 10. Mai.

Die Quincy nahm mit der Pazifischen Flotte am 20. Mai an einer taktischen Übung teil, was das erste von vielen Manövern war, die die Quincy in den Jahren 1937 und 1938 absolvierte. Vom 15. März bis zum 28. April partizipierte sie an einer wichtigen Schlachtübung der Pazifischen Flotte vor Hawaii, dem „Fleet problem XIX“. Nach einer Überholung im Mare Island Naval Shipyard nahm die Quincy an den taktischen Operationen ihrer Division vor San Clemente, Kalifornien teil. Am 4. Januar 1939 wurde die Quincy schließlich in den Nordatlantik beordert, wo sie den Rest des Jahres 1939 patrouillierte. Mit der Atlantischen Flotte nahm sie unter anderem am „Fleet Problem XX“ vom 13. bis 26. Februar teil.

Während des Zweiten Weltkriegs war die Quincy unter dem Kommando von Konteradmiral Norman Scott Teil verschiedener Task Forces, unter anderem der Task Forces 16 und 18. Im Juli 1942 war die Quincy zusammen mit weiteren Schiffen, darunter auch ihre Schwesterschiffe Astoria und Vincennes, auf dem Weg in den Südpazifik zur Invasion der Salomoneninsel Guadalcanal. Vor dem Angriff zerstörte die Quincy am 7. August mehrere japanische Einrichtungen und ein Öldepot während des Bombardements von Lunga Point. Vor der geplanten amerikanischen Invasion auf Guadalcanal wurde die Quincy während ihrer Patrouille im Kanal zwischen Florida Island und Savo Island in den frühen Morgenstunden des 9. Augusts durch japanische Kreuzer angegriffen, was zur Schlacht vor Savo Island zwischen den amerikanischen und japanischen Seestreitkräften führte. Die Besatzung der Quincy wurde durch diesen Angriff überrascht und war nicht sofort zum Feuern bereit, weshalb die Quincy im Kreuzfeuer zwischen den japanischen Kreuzern Aoba, Furutaka und Tenryū gefangen war. Infolge dessen wurde sie von zwei Torpedos der Tenryū getroffen und schwer beschädigt. Um 02:10 Uhr wurde ein Großteil der Brückenbesatzung, darunter auch der Kapitän, durch Granaten getötet. Um 02:16 Uhr wurde der Kreuzer durch einen weiteren Torpedo, diesmal von der Aoba, getroffen. Die Quincy überstand noch einige weitere direkte Treffer, die 370 Tote und 167 Verwundete an Bord des Kreuzers verursachten. Das Schiff sank schließlich in Folge seiner schweren Beschädigungen um 02:38 Uhr auch die beiden Schwesterschiffe Astoria und Vincennes wurden versenkt. Alle drei Schiffe zählten mit zu den ersten Schiffen, die im Ironbottom Sound gesunken sind.


USS Quincy (CA-39) - History

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My dad, Frank E. Ahlstrom, passed away in 1997. He survived the Savo Island disaster after spending 7 hours hanging to wreckage in the water before being picked up. He told of his gut feeling that he had to stay w/ the ship until the last second to avoid being drawn under. He slid down decks, hauled himself up, then slid and hauled several times before going into the water. He was a strong swimmer and that saved his life. He spoke of trying to keep as still as possible so as not to draw the attention of sharks.
I cannot watch the Robert Shaw (Quint) silioquy in "Jaws" or the "Titanic" movies without thinking about what our sailors went through that night and the risk of all sailors while at sea. When my dad died, his obituary mentioned his service on the Quincy CA39. A stranger showed up at his wake and said he had to come when he saw my dad's obituary. He wanted me to know that he didn't know my dad, but he lost an beloved uncle on the CA-39 and by coming he as paying respects to both of them. I will never forget that. I have a picture of a group of men from the Quincy taken before the sinking. My dad only identifies one of the sailors. I can share whatever I have. Pam

HI PAM.I READ YOUR MESSAGE ON YOUR FATHERS SURVIVAL OF THE SINKING OF THE QUINCY. MY FATHER ,ANDREW(JIM)GARNER, SURVIVED THAT EVENING ALSO.UNFORTUNATELY HE DIED OF A HEART ATTACK IN 1970 AT THE AGE OF 48.IN YOUR MESSAGE YOU MENTIONED HAVING A PICTURE TAKEN ON QUINCY,I WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING ANY PICTURES OF THE SHIP.I'M READING A BOOK CALLED"THE BATTLE OF SAVO ISLAND" BY RICHARD NEWCOMB.ITS AN EXCELLENT ACCOUNT OF THE SINKING.THANKS FOR YOUR TIME,LESLEE GARNER

My father JOHN WILLIS HEBERT also survived the sinking. He was 18 yo at the time. He later attended Tulane Law School,married and had 10 children. He, too, died of a heart attack (in 1976) at the age of 52.
My memory of his story:
He was in a boiler room when the ship was struck. He climbed to the deck, sat and took off his shoes and walked down the sloping deck to where the water met it, then swam off. He wanted to swim as far as possible before it sank so he wouldn't be "pulled in". He said there actually wasn't much suction. The ship rose on end and looked like a skyscraper, then rolled in a circle and silently slid down. He planned to swim to the island that he knew was full of Japanese soldiers, but preferred to take his chances with them rather than the sharks.
He was pulled from the water by an American ship before either happened.

My father (Mervyn Anderson-Smith) was also on the Quincy the night it sank. He never talked about it much, only how thankful he was to the Salvation Army for the candy bars and dry clothes afterwards. We still have the "skivies" he was wearing when he jumped into the water. I also would be interested in any pictures.

My father Daniel H. Galvin Jr. is also a survivor of the sinking of the USS Quincy CA39, when it sank in the Savo Islands, Augus 9, 1942.
Daniel is a very healthy 85 years young. He was a Fire Control Man. I would be interested in hearing from anyone who wants to share information or and survivors..thanks

Hi Pam! God bless you and your family! My dad that I really never knew survived on the USS Quincy! His name was Walter Earl Albright. My uncle(Chet Judd) survived too!. What a miricle! I really wished that someone who knew him could tell me more. I feel that I was seriously left out on my dad's life regarding the Quincy. Take care Doug Albright

Hello, My daddy was a surver of the USS Quincey 8-9-42 also, Marine Arvle Raymond Brake from AL. I would love to see any pictures you have. My daddy didn't speak much either. Thank you for your time and help! Gail

My dad, John (Jerry) Giardino was a survivor on CA39. He and several other survivors contributed their stories a while back (they used to attend the annual CA39 reunions). Doc Scwitters was a good friend of my dads, as was Harris Hammersmith. I still have the book - and I have an audio cassette with my dad telling his story of that fateful night.

Such brave men - I hope that our generation can keep their stories and memories alive. My dad passed away from lung cancer in 2001.

my father told me terrible stories about being in the water. he was listed as mia until found on an island weeks later. i would love to hear any stories.

My Mothers Uncle (Donald Van Meter) was on board the Quincy the night it sank. Sadly he went down with the ship. I am trying to research my family's military history. Pam you mentioned that you had a picture taken aboard the Quincy. If you still have a copy available I would like to request one.

Hi Pam!
I'm just starting to dig into my fathers Naval past. His name was Arther Donald Cornelisse but he went by "Bud". He was a survivor of the sinking of the Quincy. He was injured and lost a kidney and he too didn't speak much about that day. He passes away in 1980 from kidney failure. Any pictures or information you have would be great!

My father (John Hebert, 18 at the time) was only in the water a few hours or less, I believe. He did say the ship was at a 45 degree angle when he reached the deck (he was in a boiler room when it was hit). He sat down and took off his heavy boots so he wouldn't sink, then walked down the deck until he reached water and swam away. He said he was more afraid of the sharks than the Japanese, so his plan was to swim to the island that was controlled by the Japanese. He said he started swimming away from the Quincy quickly because he was afraid of suction pulling him under when it sank. He was 100 or so yards out when it stood straight up (he said it looked like a sky scraper) rolled 180 degrees and slid very quietly into the water. He said he felt no suction, but quite some time later huge air bubbles came up.
I don't know the name of the ship that picked him up, but he was rescued from the water before he reached the island.

Pam, is it possible for me to see the picture?
I, too, think of the Quincy when I see the Titanic standing straight up, since that is how my father described it before it slid down.

My father was on the Quincy from the time she was commissioned until she was sunk. He never talked about the war, and he died in 1982. I'd love to see that picture.


Watch the video: At Your Library: USS Quincy (December 2021).