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Dennis Burt and Group, Blackpool 1941

Dennis Burt and Group, Blackpool 1941

Dennis Burt and Group, Blackpool 1941

Picture from the collection of Dennis Burt

Original Caption: 1941-02-15 Blackpool 2nd left front row.

Copyright Gary Burt 2013

Many thanks to Gary for providing us with these photos from his father's collection.


Fact File : Civilian Internment

Internment of civilian nationals belonging to opposing sides was carried out in varying degrees by all belligerent powers in World War Two. It was also the fate of those servicemen who found themselves in a neutral country.

At the outbreak of war there were around 80,000 potential enemy aliens in Britain who, it was feared, could be spies, or willing to assist Britain's enemies in the event of an invasion. All Germans and Austrians over the age of 16 were called before special tribunals and were divided into one of three groups:

  • 'A' - high security risks, numbering just under 600, who were immediately interned
  • 'B' - 'doubtful cases', numbering around 6,500, who were supervised and subject to restrictions
  • 'C' - 'no security risk', numbering around 64,000, who were left at liberty. More than 55,000 of category 'C' were recognised as refugees from Nazi oppression. The vast majority of these were Jewish.

The situation began to change in the spring of 1940. The failure of the Norwegian campaign led to an outbreak of spy fever and agitation against enemy aliens. More and more Germans and Austrians were rounded up. Italians were also included, even though Britain was not at war with Italy until June. When Italy and Britain did go to war, there were at least 19,000 Italians in Britain, and Churchill ordered they all be rounded up. This was despite the fact that most of them had lived in Britain for decades.

Thousands of Germans, Austrians and Italians were sent to camps set up at racecourses and incomplete housing estates, such as Huyton outside Liverpool. The majority were interned on the Isle of Man, where internment camps had also been set up in World War One. Facilities were basic, but it was boredom that was the greatest enemy. Internees organised educational and artistic projects, including lectures, concerts and camp newspapers. At first married women were not allowed into the camps to see their husbands, but by August 1940 visits were permitted, and a family camp was established in late 1941.

That many of the 'enemy aliens' were Jewish refugees and therefore hardly likely to be sympathetic to the Nazis, was a complication no one bothered to try and unravel - they were still treated as German and Austrian nationals. In one Isle of Man camp over 80 per cent of the internees were Jewish refugees.

More than 7,000 internees were deported, the majority to Canada, some to Australia. The liner Arandora Star left for Canada on 1 July 1940 carrying German and Italian internees. It was torpedoed and sunk with the loss of 714 lives, most of them internees. Others being taken to Australia on the Dunera, which sailed a week later, were subjected to humiliating treatment and terrible conditions on the two-month voyage. Many had their possessions stolen or thrown overboard by the British military guards.

An outcry in Parliament led to the first releases of internees in August 1940. By February 1941 more than 10,000 had been freed, and by the following summer, only 5,000 were left in internment camps. Many of those released from internment subsequently contributed to the war effort on the Home Front or served in the armed forces.

As regards British citizens interned by the Nazis, in September 1942 the Germans sent 2,000 British-born civilians from the Channel Islands to internment camps in Germany. Another 200 were deported in January 1943, as a reprisal for a British commando raid.

In 1941-2 approximately 130,000 civilians from Allied countries living and working in colonies invaded by the Japanese were interned. These included men, women and children from the Netherlands, the UK, Australia, New Zealand and the USA. The camps varied in size some were segregated according to gender or race but there were also many camps of mixed gender. One of the largest un-segregated camps was the Stanley internment camp in Hong Kong, which held 2,800 mainly British internees. Unlike prisoners of war, the internees were not compelled to work, but they were held in harsh conditions in primitive camps. Brutality by the Japanese guards was common and death rates were high.

Internment was also carried out in the USA after the Americans entered the war in December 1941. Some 100,000 Japanese-Americans living on the west coast of America were interned, often in very poor conditions.

The fact files in this timeline were commissioned by the BBC in June 2003 and September 2005. Find out more about the authors who wrote them.


Dennis Burt and Group, Blackpool 1941 - History

RAF Station Commanders - Wales and North West England

xx Sep 1940 Sqn Ldr R Benham

xx Dec 1941 Sqn Ldr T B Byrne

xx Apr 1943 Sqn Ldr K O Sayers

xx Aug 1945 Sqn Ldr S R Thomas

xx Feb 1946 Sqn Ldr N P W Hancock

May 1946 Care and Maintenance

xx Jan 1959 Gp Capt P L Baldwin

21 Oct 1960 Gp Capt D R Griffiths (OC, GWRU)

27 Apr 1964 Wg Cdr R S Sanders

3 Oct 1966 Wg Cdr A C Richards

21 Mar 1969 Wg Cdr M Kaye

31 Aug 1971 Wg Cdr L D Carver

xx Jan 1973 Wg Cdr D T Cann

20 Jun 1975 Wg Cdr A C Richards

29 Mar 1976 Wg Cdr I R Davies

17 Nov 1978 Wg Cdr B L Wood

xx Jun 1981 Wg Cdr T J Sneddon

xx Mar 1984 Sqn Ldr P M Eckert

RAF B arrow-in-Furness (Walney Island)

xx xxx 1945? Gp Capt G P Macdonald

xx xxx 1974 Gp Capt P Champniss

15 Oct 1976 Gp Capt B J Lemon

26 Sep 1980 Gp Capt A Neale

22 Oct 1982 Gp Capt M J Gibson

19 Oct 1984 Gp Capt D R H MacGregor

4 Oct 1942 Gp Capt J H Dand

xx Dec 1955 Gp Capt A J Trumble

30 Jan 1961 Gp Capt L F Bryant-Fenn

RAF Burtonwood was for much of its life commanded by USAAF/USAF Officers but the RAF maintained an officer holding the appointment of nominal RAF Officer Commanding/Commander

1 Apr 1940 Sqn Ldr Stibbs

xx xxx 1940 Wg Cdr Burt

5 Jan 1942 Wg Cdr W G Wolliams

18 Jan 1946 Wg Cdr W F M McDonagh (also OC, No 276 MU)

27 Sep 1946 Wg Cdr G P Mote (also OC, No 276 MU)

11 Apr 1947 Gp Capt M S Shapcott (also OC, No 276 MU)

15 Dec 1948 Wg Cdr S E Hearnden (also OC, No 276 MU)

xx Mar 1949 Wg Cdr L F Oldridge (also OC, No 276 MU)

30 Jan 1950 Gp Capt R Bayne-Brown (also OC, No 276 MU)

xx Aug 1950 Wg Cdr A E Harbot

xx May 1955 Wg Cdr G L Lister

xx Aug 1959 Wg Cdr A W G Stuart

xx Mar 1960 Sqn Ldr H G Bruce

xx Sep 1961 Flt Lt J McLaughlan

xx Apr 1963 Flt Lt J Wilson

xx Nov 1963 Flt Lt W J Burnett-Smith

xx Jan 1966 Fg Off B W Southwold

xx Jan 1967 Sqn Ldr G C Taylor

xx Feb 1967 Sqn Ldr R P du Pleiss

xx Jun 1969 Sqn Ldr A A Francis

xx Jul 1972 Sqn Ldr R A Stubings

xx Feb 1976 Sqn Ldr B Lamb

xx Oct 1977 Sqn Ldr P J E Tyson-Woodcock

xx Mar 1980 Sqn Ldr C F Hopper

xx Jul 1982 Sqn Ldr A H Howard

xx May 1985 Sqn Ldr J M Young

xx xxx 1939 Sqn Ldr G S Trewin

1 Apr 1940 Sqn Ldr G S Trewin

RAF Carlisle (No 14 MU)

xx Nov 1953 Gp Capt A Selby

10 Jul 1961 Gp Capt J A D Sturges

25 Nov 1969 Gp Capt S Baillie

28 Feb 1972 Gp Capt G W Bennington

8 Jan 1973 Gp Capt L C Price

xx Jul 1975 Gp Capt I D Wilkinson

5 Sep 1977 Gp Capt G R Pengelly

xx xxx xxxx Gp Capt E T I King?

8 Feb 1982 Gp Capt G W Cargill

16 Jan 1984 Gp Capt V B Howells

16 Dec 1985 Gp Capt W Girdwood

xx Feb 1988 Gp Capt P Markey

14 Oct 1942 Sqn Ldr T W Bamford *

3 Nov 1942 Sqn Ldr C O'Donoghue*

29 Mar 1943 Wg Cdr D G Warren*

31 May 1944 Sqn Ldr A Wharton*

3 Jun 1944 Wg Cdr K D Baird*

1 Jul 1945 Placed on Care & Maintenance

18 Oct 1939 Gp Capt C B Dalison*

16 Mar 1959 Gp Capt A W Caswell*

30 Oct 1961 Gp Capt L H Moulton*

22 Nov 1965 Gp Capt H Durkin*

6 Apr 1970 Gp Capt W M Smedley*

xx Jan 1975 Gp Capt A Thirkettle*

23 Aug 1976 Gp Capt R L Smith*

7 Aug 1978 Gp Capt D G Campbell*

13 Oct 1980 Gp Capt W F Mullen*

27 Sep 1982 Gp Capt T J Morgan*

xx xxx 2000 Gp Capt L J Burrell**

xx xxx xxxx Gp Capt J Johnston

xx Apr 2013 Gp Capt A Sansom

xx xxx 2015: Gp Capt M Hunt

xx Jul 2017: Gp Capt A J Baker

19 Oct 1940 Wg Cdr R J Cooper*

14 Apr 1941 Wg Cdr O A Morris*

6 Jan - 10 Mar 1942 Wg Cdr R G Musson (Temp)

xx xxx xxxx Wg Cdr D G Warren

*OC, No 2 School of Air Navigation

20 Feb 1941 Wg Cdr A F Scroggs*

26 Feb 1941 Wg Cdr/Gp Capt F G A Robinson (Gp Capt from 1 Mar)*

17 Nov 1941 Gp Capt C R Keary

xx Jan 1946 Gp Capt A C Brown

xx May 1942 Gp Capt P J R King

xx Oct 1943 Gp Capt J A McDonald

25 May 1941 Wg Cdr J S L Adams

3 Oct 1942 Gp Capt A B Woodhall

24 Mar 1943 Gp Capt J Herby-Percy

19 Jun 1944 Wg Cdr C D L Griffiths

18 Aug 1945 Wg Cdr A Eyre (killed in flying accident 16 Feb 1946)

28 Mar 1946 Wg Cdr H J L Hallowes

xx May 1954 Wg Cdr R V B Franklyn

xx Dec 1957 Wg Cdr T R F Handcock

9 Nov 1959 Wg Cdr T J da C Andrade

26 Sep 1962 Wg Cdr R B Thomas

21 Jun 1965 Wg Cdr J H Cook

xx xxx 1957 Sqn Ldr J C Callingham

13 Nov 1961 Wg Cdr G A L Elliott

24 Aug 1964 Wg Cdr D P J Smith

xx Dec 1958 Wg Cdr A L Cornford

xx xxx xxxx Gp Capt H V Alloway** (1944)

13 May 1945 Gp Capt E W Whitley***

21 Jun 1945 Wg Cdr P J Simpson***

3 Jul 1945 Gp Capt L G Burnand***

30 Jun 1943 Gp Capt W M M Hurley*

RAF Hednesford (OC, No 6 SoTT)

RAF Hereford (OC, No 3 SoTT)

18 Jun 1962 Gp Capt G G Robinson

4 May 1964 Gp Capt J T Shaw

14 Mar 1966 Gp Capt D S Cartwright-Terry

28 Oct 1968 Gp Capt D B Ross

1 Jun 1971 Gp Capt K J Hitchcock

11 Feb 1974 Gp Capt D G Gregory

2 Feb 1976 Gp Capt J L Clayson

25 Jan 1978 Gp Capt E Kinder

14 Feb 1980 Gp Capt R S Beecham

21 Dec 1981 Gp Capt M J C W Dicken

12 Dec 1983 Gp Capt T B Sherington

xx xxx xxxx Wg Cdr C A Pritchard

7 Jul 1943 Gp Capt A G Miller*

28 Jul 1943 Wg Cdr B R O'B Hoare* (Temp)

1 Sep 1943 Wg Cdr V J Wheeler* (Temp)

21 Oct 1943 Gp Capt W G Moseby

25 May 1942 Sqn Ldr J L Girling (SOA)

8 Jun 1942 Gp Capt H McC White

15 May 1944 Gp Capt R A C Barclay

13 Mar 1945 Gp Capt C Walter

10 Dec 1940 Wg Cdr E A McNab

xx xxx 1952 Gp Capt F R Worthington (killed on 23 Sep 1953 in flying accident)

26 Apr 1961 Gp Capt A P Dart

xx xxx xxxx Flt Lt J Conning (1965)

23 Apr 1941 Flt Lt R S Blackman*

24 Jun 1942 Gp Capt C E Horrex

17 Jun 1943 Gp Capt P G Heffernan RAAF (injured in collision of X3924 and LN295 on 6 Nov 1943)

9 Nov 1943 Gp Capt E Burton (injured in a car accident 17 Dec 1944)

17 Dec 1944 Wg Cdr A W Doubleday RAAF (Temp OC- CI)

1 Jan 1945 Gp Capt H I Dabinett

Many thanks to Chris Pointon for providing the info to update this entry.


Montgomery Bus Boycott

Spurred by Rosa Parks, who, in 1955 was arrested for refusing to give up her seat on a Montgomery, Alabama bus, CORE supported a boycott of the city&aposs busses, leaving them with low ridership for a year. In 1956, the Supreme Court ruled the state&aposs bus segregation laws were unconstitutional.

The boycott became a model for civil disobedience in the civil rights movement, and, the King institute notes, CORE promoted King’s work during the bus boycott, adding that in October 1957 the leader agreed to serve on the CORE advisory committee.

King’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) went on to work with CORE on several projects, including the support of integrated education, voter education and the Chicago Campaign.


Recomended Reading.

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Links

The Wartime Memories Project is a non profit organisation run by volunteers.

Helping people find out more about their relatives wartime experiences since 1999 by recording and preserving recollections, documents, photographs and small items.

This website is paid for out of our own pockets, library subscriptions and from donations made by visitors. The popularity of the site means that it is far exceeding available resources.

If you are enjoying the site, please consider making a donation, however small to help with the costs of keeping the site running.


Fact File : Civilian Internment

Internment of civilian nationals belonging to opposing sides was carried out in varying degrees by all belligerent powers in World War Two. It was also the fate of those servicemen who found themselves in a neutral country.

At the outbreak of war there were around 80,000 potential enemy aliens in Britain who, it was feared, could be spies, or willing to assist Britain's enemies in the event of an invasion. All Germans and Austrians over the age of 16 were called before special tribunals and were divided into one of three groups:

  • 'A' - high security risks, numbering just under 600, who were immediately interned
  • 'B' - 'doubtful cases', numbering around 6,500, who were supervised and subject to restrictions
  • 'C' - 'no security risk', numbering around 64,000, who were left at liberty. More than 55,000 of category 'C' were recognised as refugees from Nazi oppression. The vast majority of these were Jewish.

The situation began to change in the spring of 1940. The failure of the Norwegian campaign led to an outbreak of spy fever and agitation against enemy aliens. More and more Germans and Austrians were rounded up. Italians were also included, even though Britain was not at war with Italy until June. When Italy and Britain did go to war, there were at least 19,000 Italians in Britain, and Churchill ordered they all be rounded up. This was despite the fact that most of them had lived in Britain for decades.

Thousands of Germans, Austrians and Italians were sent to camps set up at racecourses and incomplete housing estates, such as Huyton outside Liverpool. The majority were interned on the Isle of Man, where internment camps had also been set up in World War One. Facilities were basic, but it was boredom that was the greatest enemy. Internees organised educational and artistic projects, including lectures, concerts and camp newspapers. At first married women were not allowed into the camps to see their husbands, but by August 1940 visits were permitted, and a family camp was established in late 1941.

That many of the 'enemy aliens' were Jewish refugees and therefore hardly likely to be sympathetic to the Nazis, was a complication no one bothered to try and unravel - they were still treated as German and Austrian nationals. In one Isle of Man camp over 80 per cent of the internees were Jewish refugees.

More than 7,000 internees were deported, the majority to Canada, some to Australia. The liner Arandora Star left for Canada on 1 July 1940 carrying German and Italian internees. It was torpedoed and sunk with the loss of 714 lives, most of them internees. Others being taken to Australia on the Dunera, which sailed a week later, were subjected to humiliating treatment and terrible conditions on the two-month voyage. Many had their possessions stolen or thrown overboard by the British military guards.

An outcry in Parliament led to the first releases of internees in August 1940. By February 1941 more than 10,000 had been freed, and by the following summer, only 5,000 were left in internment camps. Many of those released from internment subsequently contributed to the war effort on the Home Front or served in the armed forces.

As regards British citizens interned by the Nazis, in September 1942 the Germans sent 2,000 British-born civilians from the Channel Islands to internment camps in Germany. Another 200 were deported in January 1943, as a reprisal for a British commando raid.

In 1941-2 approximately 130,000 civilians from Allied countries living and working in colonies invaded by the Japanese were interned. These included men, women and children from the Netherlands, the UK, Australia, New Zealand and the USA. The camps varied in size some were segregated according to gender or race but there were also many camps of mixed gender. One of the largest un-segregated camps was the Stanley internment camp in Hong Kong, which held 2,800 mainly British internees. Unlike prisoners of war, the internees were not compelled to work, but they were held in harsh conditions in primitive camps. Brutality by the Japanese guards was common and death rates were high.

Internment was also carried out in the USA after the Americans entered the war in December 1941. Some 100,000 Japanese-Americans living on the west coast of America were interned, often in very poor conditions.

The fact files in this timeline were commissioned by the BBC in June 2003 and September 2005. Find out more about the authors who wrote them.


WRITINGS

Stage Plays:

Wrote Impressions on Love, New York City.

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Records available only at The National Archives in Kew

To access these records you will either need to visit us, pay for research ( £ ) or, where you can identify a specific record reference , order a copy ( £ ).

Criminal calendars (1868-1971)

Search Discovery, our catalogue , by year range in HO 140 to find records which give the place and date of trials. The records are arranged by year and then alphabetically by county. These records are usually opened to the public after 100 years but calendars up to 1929 are open.

Trial records of the Supreme Court of Judicature and Central Criminal Court (1834- )

Search our catalogue by surname or charge for criminal trial records in J (includes Crown Court records from 1972 onwards) and CRIM. If the charge is not known, search using the word ‘charge’. This will eliminate non-criminal records. Please note that not all of these records have been catalogued by name.

You can use AND to find more than one term in a description, for example Smith AND larceny.

Criminal appeal case files (1945- )

Search our catalogue by last name in J 82 for case files of criminal appeals.

Assize courts records (1559-1971)

From 1559 until 1971 the more serious criminal offences tended to be dealt with by the assize courts, although this was not always the case. The counties in England and Wales were grouped into assize ‘circuits’ where cases were heard. In 1971 they were replaced by the crown courts.

The assize courts records are held at The National Archives in the ASSI department , arranged by county and circuit. To get started, consult the ‘Record series key’ in the appendix of the guide to Criminal trials in the assize courts 1559–1971.


Dennis Burt and Group, Blackpool 1941 - History

These records, compiled by Miles Templeton with assistance from fellow boxing historian Richard Ireland, are the first of a large number that will be published on this website. Records for most of the leading British boxers from the twentieth century will be made available over the next few years.

The backbone of these records is the weekly trade paper Boxing News (until 1941 published as Boxing). Many contests, however, were not published in the trade paper, and so Miles and Richard have consulted numerous other papers to ensure as many bouts as possible are recorded for each boxer.

In pursuit of these extra fights they have accessed over 350 regional British newspapers. Take a look at the record for Tommy Barrett of Penzance to see just how many of his contests were not reported in Boxing News and only appeared in Cornwall and Devon newspapers. Miles has worked closely with most of the leading historians of the last 40 years and he has named them as the source where results were obtained directly from them.

IMPORTANT: please credit us for our work

The bulk of the research behind these records has been conducted by Miles, but for the last five years Richard has made weekly trips to the British Newspaper Library at Colindale and unearthed thousands of extra bouts that have been added to Miles's records. Therefore each record is attributed to Miles and Richard.

You may reproduce these records elsewhere provided Miles and Richard are credited appropriately for their research.

Please add the following message to any page where one of our records is republished (Boxrec.com editors: please add this, including the link, to the relevant boxer's Boxrec Wiki page):

"This record has been compiled by Miles Templeton and Richard Ireland of www.boxinghistory.org.uk. Please visit this site if you require further information about this boxer, as there is much more material available."

We would ask anyone who wishes to reproduce these records elsewhere to respect the hard work that has gone into their compilation. Failure to credit us in the requested manner may mean that we do not publish further records.


Adams County Illinois Genealogy!

Share your Adams County discoveries

Drop us a note if you can share things like:

  • local family histories, memoirs, diaries, family trees
  • old phone or business directories
  • links to relevant websites
  • success stories–what resources or research techniques have worked for you
  • to report an error or broken links

We may be able to scan and digitize books that are no longer under copyright restrictions. Let us know who you are researching so we can grow our Surnames page. Just contact us.

Hit a brick wall in searching for your kin? Have you tried:

  1. Searching in neighboring counties and states – see bottom of page
  2. Find a Facebook group – search by surname or by location

Neighboring County Sites:

Dennis Partridge

County coordinator for ILGenWeb. Do you have content to share? Do you have questions, comments, or to report a broken link or other issue, contact Dennis Partridge at [email protected] Some questions may be answered on our FAQ page.

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Watch the video: The lights come on at Blackpool 1949 (December 2021).