News

Harold Copping

Harold Copping

Harold Copping was born in 1863. After studying at the Royal Academy School he visited Paris on a Landseer Scholarship. He became an accomplished illustrator and early books included Hammond's Hard Lines (1894), Miss Bobbie (1897), Millionaire (1898), A Queen Among Girls (1900), Pilgrim's Progress (1903), Westward Ho! (1903), Grace Abounding (1905), Three School Chums (1907), Children's Stories from Dickens (1911), Little Women (1912), Good Wives (1913), A Christmas Carol (1920) and Character Sketches from Boz (1924).

Copping was commissioned to produce illustrations for the Bible. To achieve authenticity for his illustrations he travelled in Palestine. The resulting book, The Copping Bible (1910), was a best-seller and led to more Bible commissions. This included A Journalist in the Holy Land (1911, The Golden Land (1911), The Bible Story Book (1923) and My Bible Book (1931).

As well as book illustrations, Copping contributed to the periodicals, The Leisure Hour, Little Folks, Pearson's Magazine, The Royal Magazine, The Temple Magazine and The Windsor Magazine.

Harold Copping, who lived in Shoreham and Sevenoaks, died in 1932.


Contents

Harold Copping was born in Camden Town in 1863. He grew up in St. Pancras and studied at the Royal Academy of Arts , where he was able to achieve a Landseer Scholarship. It wasn't long before Copping was an established and successful painter. Because of his association with the London Missionary Society , Copping began illustrating biblical scenes early on. In order to be able to paint particularly realistic pictures, he went on study trips to Palestine and Egypt . In 1910, a special edition of the Bible illustrated by Copping ( The Copping Bible ) resulted from the numerous pictures of biblical motifs that Copping had painted. In order to be able to use family members and friends as models for his paintings, Copping had his own stock of costumes and props at home. Reproductions of Coppings' pictures in the form of color lithographs were particularly popular on missions.

The most famous illustration Coppings is the hope of the world ( The Hope of the World ). This picture shows Jesus in the midst of a group of children from different continents of the earth. Copping was under contract with the Religious Tract Society , for which he painted twelve pictures of religious subjects annually until his death. The exclusive contract forbade Copping, who was paid £ 50 per picture, to paint religious subjects for any other organization or publisher. But Copping also illustrated numerous other literary works. This included both novels by Charles Dickens and works based on these by his daughter Mary Angela Dickens . There are also illustrations for magazines. Copping spent his old age in Shoreham, Kent, where he died on July 1, 1932 at the age of 68. He was buried in the church cemetery of St Peter and St Paul in Shoreham.


Harold Copping - History

Mr. Pecksniff and Old Martin Chuzzlewit

From Character Sketches from Dickens , facing p. 70

The scene illustrated occurs in serial episode four (chapter 10, "Containing Strange Matter on which many events in this history, may, for their own good or evil influence, chiefly depend" (April 1843).

Scanned image, caption, and commentary below by Philip V. Allingham

[You may use this image without prior permission for any scholarly or educational purpose as long as you (1) credit the person who scanned the image and (2) link your document to this URL in a web document or cite the Victorian Web in a print one. .]

In one of his prefaces to Martin Chuzzlewit , Dickens declares that his main object was "to exhibit in a variety of aspects the commonest of all vices to show how selfishness propagates itself and to what a grim giant it may grow, from small beginnings." In the person of Pecksniff he created a character that has become a by-word for hypocrisy, whilst other characters, such as Sairey Gamp and old Martin Chuzzlewit, have taken their place in the gallery of immortals. On the reverse side, equally inimitable, are to be found Tom Pinch, Mark Tapley, Ruth Pinch, John Westlock, and scores of others. The selections made from the book represent these phases. Old Martin is introduced in the first excerpt, delightful Ruth Pinch and her brother in the next, whilst the immortal tea party of Sairey Gamp and Betsy Prig forms the third.

Bibliography

Matz, B. W., and Kate Perugini illustrated by Harold Copping. Character Sketches from Dickens . London: Raphael Tuck, 1924. Copy in the Paterson Library, Lakehead University.


Harold Copping - History

In compiling the selection of incidents and stories from the works of Dickens comprised in this volume, my choice has been restricted by the series of pictures from the clever brush of Mr. Harold Copping which adorns its pages. My aim has been to make each excerpt a complete story or cameo in itself, and to allow the story to be told exclusively in Dickens's own words.

Dickens's books are so popular, so well read and known, that it is quite unnecessary to give the details of the story or of the characters which lead up to the incident. Even were this not so, it is believed that the excerpts here given will be found complete enough to follow for those who have never read the book from which they have been extracted whilst those who know them well will welcome an opportunity of reading them once again, with Mr. Copping's realistic pictures to refresh their visualization of the characters.

Dickens's characters are not mere puppets ticketed with a name. They are real flesh and blood, human beings, who, under the magic spell of his genius, became imbued with a vitality which will outlive the fame of many historic personages.

No English novelist has peopled the world of imaginative literature with such a concourse of real persons as Dickens has, [13/14] each of whom differs and stands apart from the others, possessing a separate and distinct individuality of his or her own—characters we have come to know so well as to claim them as our own personal friends. Indeed, it may be said, with truth that we know the people of Dickens's books more intimately than we do our own friends. Most persons are acquainted with them and their idiosyncracies in a greater or lesser degree, from the inimitable Pickwickians of his first book, through the whole list of the others, to the angular Mr. Grewgious in the last: their characteristics and sayings are familiar to all classes. Those who represent types have their names used as synonyms for the type they stand for, and have become part of the stock of the world's common knowledge, the mere mention of which conveys a whole philosophy in a word.

This is a wonderful tribute to Dickens's genius. It is a tribute that Dickens would have valued more than any other. Indeed, an incident occurred to him on one occasion which indicated this to be the case. On one of his reading tours he was stopped in the street by a lady who had heard him read, and who accosted him with the appeal, "Mr. Dickens, will you let me touch the hand that has filled my house with many friends?" He was greatly touched by this personal greeting, and in a letter to his biographer, telling him of it, assured him that the unknown lady's expression brought him near what he sometimes dreamed might be his fame.

His dream was fulfilled, and to-day his fame rests a good deal on his genius for creating real living characters, personages as familiar to all races of the world as are the most notable names in history, and in many cases even more familiar. They have indeed become a part of history, and are believed in more sincerely than many a warrior or statesman whose name looms large in our annals. So that if Dickens's fame rested upon nothing else than this happy circumstance of having filled many homes with many friends, it would be such a fame as he himself most desired, and would have been sufficient to place him in the forefront as England's national and most popular novelist.

But Dickens's books have other and equally sound and solid foundations upon which they were reared. They are human they reveal the truth of nature, and appeal to every phase of humanity by a common bond.

Written decades ago, when fashions, foibles, superstitions, politics, were different from those of our days, they are still admired and revered, not on account of antiquity, but in spite of it. In the following pages will be found stories and scenes exhibiting all phases of Dickens's power, and introducing characters as divergent as the po1es, symbolizing all the virtues and some of the vices to which human nature is heir. No modern artist is known to us who is so well equipped with knowledge, sympathy, and perfect understanding of these characters as Mr. Harold Copping for the task of pictorially embellishing these pages.[15]—B. W. Matz

Bibliography

Matz, B. W., and Kate Perugini illustrated by Harold Copping. Character Sketches from Dickens . London: Raphael Tuck, 1924. Copy in the Paterson Library, Lakehead University.


Harold Copping - History

Photo provided by: Jane Mosher Page

Joseph Copping's home in Boscobel

History and Geneology, Copping Family.

My great-grandfather was George Copping. Born in Hatfield, County of Kent, England. 1777

His wife was Eliza (Elizabeth) Saggers, also born in England.

George Copping came to Canada in a sail boat in 1812 with his wife and 3 small children. My grandfather was one. he was also born in Hatfield, County of Kent, England and was only 3 years old when they came to Canada and settled in Montreal for a time.

I think George was in real estate or lumber business in Montreal, probably both, when the big fire razed Montreal in 1820 (àI think it was). He was ruined. He went to Rawdon, Quebec and took up farming. Rawdon is in the foothills of the Laurentian mountains. It must have been hard for I believe George was a school master in a Boy's School in England. However he did well and raised a big family.

My grandfather was William Copping born in Hatfield, England. His wife was Margaret Gray, born in County Sligo, Ireland which is right on the border of Scotland and she talked more like a Scots woman than Irish.
Of this marriage 10 sons and 1 daughter namely:

G eorge Copping

Joseph Copping (my father)

My maternal grandparents were Benjamin Truax, Born in Vermont 1812. Died Boscobel 1891.
His wife was Catharine Carter (or Chartier) born in Milton, Quebec 1819. She died in Boscobel 1913.

They had 3 daughters namely:

Didamia Truax , died in infancy.

Annie Augusta Truax , born Jan. 30th 1850 (my mother).

Pamalia Adelaide Truax , born Dec. 28th 1851. Died at Waterloo home (?) 1941.

The latter never married so I have no near relations on my mother's side.

My father Joseph Copping at 16 years of age, walked from Rawdon to Boscobel, a distance of nearly 100 miles, with his two older brothers and took up land and started in lumber. Business hard sledding at first but they succeeded and became quite well off in time.

In 1873 Joseph Copping married Annie Augusta Truax and of this marriage 6 children were born.

Norman Benjamin Copping , Aug 2, 1874

Grace Didamia Copping , June 6, 1876

William Carter Copping , June 22, 1878

James Wilfred Copping , April 30, 1880

Maud Catherine Copping, March 3, 1882 (me)

Clifford Grant Copping, May 1, 1884

Annie Augusta died following Grant's birth of blood poison and hemorrhages. This was in 1884 horse and buggy days and no telephone. 9 miles from Dr. By the time he got there it was too late. She passed away May 6th 1884 and left Joseph with 6 small children but good man that he was, he kept us altogether except Grant, 6 days old, went to live with grandparents Truax who lived only 2 miles away. Aunt Addie promised our mother when she was dying that she would stay with the other 5 of us for a year, but she stayed with us 'til Joseph (my father) married again in Nov. 1886.

Joseph Copping married 2nd time to Emily Elizabeth Moffatt of West Ely, Quebec formerly of Waterloo, Quebec. She was a wonderful stepmother and treated us as her very own. Of this marriage 2 daughters were born, namely:

Laura Gertrude Copping Sept. 15, 1887

Annie May Copping Feb 13, 1889

Jospeh Copping was killed in his own lumber yard. Fractured skull June 6th., 1907.

Emily died of heart attack in Waterloo, Quebec Oct 22, 1933. Both are buried in Boscobel.

Norman Benjamin Copping married Evelina Elizabeth Oborne Sept. 28, 1904 They were married by Rev. J.W. Martin in church of St. John the Divine, Boscobel, Quebec. They had no family.

Grace Didamia Copping married June 1, 1904 Nelson Richard Moffatt. They were married in Church of St. John the Divine, Boscobel, Rev. J.W. Martin officiated. Of this marriage 4 were born, namely:

Marjorie Maud Moffatt , June 17, 1909

Allison Laura Moffatt , Aug. 9, 1911

Russell Copping Moffatt , Jan. 24, 1914

Brenda Anne Moffatt , Oct. 31, 1917 Brenda died at birth.

Grace Didamia died of heart attack in Kingsbury, Quebec, Jan. 14, 1925.

Nelson died in Kingsbury, Quebec, Feb. 20, 1940

William Carter Copping married Isabel Lummis on Aug 10, 1914. They were married in St. John the Divine, Boscobel, Quebec. Her father Reverend Cornwallis Lummis officiated, assisted by Rev. James Lummis, brother of the bride. Of this marriage 3 sons were born, namely:

Stanley Gordon Copping , Dec.3, 1915

Clarence Lummis Copping , Dec 18, 1917

Bertal Copping , died in infancy.

Clarence (Bud) was killed in action in R.A.F. shot down over Bay of Biscay in March 1940.

William Carter Copping died in Waterloo, Quebec June 15, 1958

Isabel Lummis Copping died in Waterloo, Quebec Nov 20, 1966

James Wilfred (Fred) Copping married Lena Norris of Bethany, Quebec on Aug 18, 1909. They were married in Methodist Church in Bethany, Quebec. Issue of this marriage were 5 children, namely:

Wilfred Charles Copping , June 12, 1910

Ralph Leon Copping , July 20, 1911

Joseph George Roy Copping , May 17, 1913

Twins- James Earl Copping

Helena Pearl Copping born May 20th, 1921

Jean Nellie Copping was adopted Sept. 4, 1918

James Wilfred (Fred) died in Sherbrooke Hospital, Quebec Dec. 26, 1958

Clifford Grant Copping married Florence Helena Laurie of West Ely, Quebec, June 24, 1908. Her parents were John Robert Laurie, born in London, England and Hannah Norris of Bethany, Quebec. Grant and Florence were married in St. James Church, West Farnham, Rev. J. Taylor (sp?) officiated. Witnesses were John Robert Laurie her father, Kenneth F. Derry of Montreal and Maud C. Copping. Of this marriage 3 children were born, namely:

Evelyn Alice Copping , Feb. 28, 1910

Clifford Laurie Copping , June 23, 1914

Kathaleen Isabel Florence Copping , Nov. 7, 1923

Laura Gertrude Copping married Daniel Duncan Nixon of North Ely, Quebec on Sept. 14, 1912. They were married in St. John the Divine, Boscobel, Quebec. Of this marriage 3 children were born, namely:

Brenda Emily Nixon , Dec. 26, 1914

Ross Copping Nixon , Nov. 11, 1918

Gladys Isabel Nixon , Oct 5, 1923

Daniel D. Nixon died in Wales Home, Aug. 10, 1966

Laura Gertrude Nixon died in Wales Home, Oct 28, 1967

Annie May Copping married Henry Howard Savage of South Stukely, Quebec on June 28, 1918. He was the son of Alfred Savage and his wife Marinda Knowlton. They were married in Church of St. John the Divine, Boscobel, Rev. Charles Ireland officiated assisted by Rev. C. Lummis. Of this marriage one son was born namely:

Russell Alfred Savage Oct 13, 1920

Henry H. Savage died in Waterloo Hospital May 8, 1971

Annie May Savage died in Waterloo Hospital 1976

Jane Mosher Page, granddaughter of Maud Catherine Copping Derry, adds.

Maud Catherine Copping married Kenneth Francis Ogilvy Derry on Tuesday September 22, 1908 at St. John the Divine Church, Boscobel, Quebec at 3 P.M. Kenneth was the son of John David Derry and Alice Gertrude Moffatt. Of this marriage 3 children were born, namely:

Dorothy Gertrude Derry March 1, 1910 died Feb 3, 1999 Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, ashes buried Boscobel, Quebec.

Wallace Moffatt Derry March 26, 1916 died 1986 in Florida, USA, ashes buried Crystal Lake Cemetery, Stanstead, Quebec.

A son , stillborn May 18, 1919

Maud Catherine Copping Derry died in Sherbrooke Hospital, Quebec on July 9, 1976.


COPPING Genealogy

WikiTree is a community of genealogists growing an increasingly-accurate collaborative family tree that's 100% free for everyone forever. Please join us.

Please join us in collaborating on COPPING family trees. We need the help of good genealogists to grow a completely free shared family tree to connect us all.

IMPORTANT PRIVACY NOTICE & DISCLAIMER: YOU HAVE A RESPONSIBILITY TO USE CAUTION WHEN DISTRIBUTING PRIVATE INFORMATION. WIKITREE PROTECTS MOST SENSITIVE INFORMATION BUT ONLY TO THE EXTENT STATED IN THE TERMS OF SERVICE AND PRIVACY POLICY.


Né à Camden Town en 1863, il était le deuxième fils du journaliste Edward Copping (1829-1904) et de Rose Heathilla (née Prout) (1832-1877), la fille de l'aquarelliste John Skinner Prout. Son frère, Arthur E. Copping, sera un auteur, journaliste et voyageur reconnu, membre de l'Armée du salut.

Admis à la Royal Academy de Londres, Harold Copping y décroche une bourse pour étudier à Paris. Il se fera connaître comme illustrateur prolifique de scènes bibliques. Il travaille aussi pour des périodiques, tels que Little Folks, et des livres de son époque, comme des ouvrages de Charles Dickens [ 1 ] .

Harold Copping épouse Violet Amy Prout (1865-1894) en 1888. Ils ont trois enfants, Ernest Noel Copping (1889-1978), Romney Copping (1891-1910) et Violet Copping (1891-1892), mais Violet Copping décède à l'âge de 29 ans seulement, et Harold Copping se remarie trois ans plus tard avec Edith Louise Mothersill (née en 1876). Deux enfants naissent de cette union : Joyce Copping (1901-1934) et John Clarence Copping (1914-1977).

Il vit et travaille pendant de nombreuses années dans son "studio" de Shoreham dans le Kent, où il décède le 1 er juillet 1932 à l'âge de 68 ans. Il est inhumé dans le cimetière de l'église St Pierre et St Paul à Shoreham.

Illustrations bibliques Modifier

Copping avait des liens avec la London Missionary Society (LMS), qui lui a commandé un recueil d'illustrations bibliques. Afin d'assurer l'authenticité et le réalisme de ses illustrations, il se rendit en Palestine et Égypte. Le livre qui en est résulté, "The Copping Bible" (1910), est devenu un best-seller qui a donné lieu à de nouvelles commandes. Parmi celles-ci, citons "Un journaliste en Terre Sainte" (1911), "La terre d'or" (1911), "Le livre de l'histoire de la Bible" (1923) et "Mon livre de la Bible" (1931). Dans nombre de ses peintures bibliques, Harold Copping a fait figurer le torchon rayé de sa femme, porté sur la tête par divers personnages. Les aquarelles de Copping, magnifiquement exécutées, ont été placées sur des diapositives de lanterne et ont été utilisées par les missionnaires chrétiens du monde entier. Ses images ont également été largement reproduites par des sociétés missionnaires sous forme d'affiches, de tracts et d'illustrations de magazines [ 2 ] .

La plus célèbre des illustrations de la Bible de Copping est probablement "L'espoir du monde", peinte par Harold Copping pour la London Missionary Society en 1915. Elle représente Jésus assis avec un groupe d'enfants de différents continents. Sandy Brewer écrit à son propos : "L'espoir du monde est sans doute l'image de Jésus la plus populaire produite en Grande-Bretagne au XX e siècle. C'est une image emblématique du mouvement des écoles du dimanche entre 1915 et 1960 [ 3 ] ". James Thorpe juge quant à lui, dans son livre English Illustration : the Nineties, que "L'œuvre d'Harold Copping, aussi compétente et honnête soit-elle, n'inspire pas un grand enthousiasme il y a tant d'artistes qui font des illustrations aussi satisfaisantes en traduction littérale qu'il manque une forte individualité personnelle." [ 1 ] Copping signe ensuite un contrat avec la Religious Tract Society (RTS) pour produire 12 peintures religieuses par an jusqu'à sa mort, payées 50 livres sterling chaque. Selon les termes du contrat, il n'était pas autorisé à peindre des tableaux religieux pour un autre éditeur [ 2 ] .

Autres œuvres Modifier

Harold Copping a aussi peint des sujets non bibliques, notamment en début de carrière, illustrant des livres comme "Hammond's Hard Lines" (1894), "Miss Bobbie" (1897), "Millionaire" (1898), "A Queen Among Girls" (1900), "The Pilgrim's Progress" (1903), "Westward Ho! (en) " (1903), "Grace Abounding" (La grâce qui abonde, 1905), "Three School Chums" (Trois copains d'école, 1907), "Little Women" (Les petites femmes, 1912), "Good Wives" (Les bonnes épouses, 1913), "A Christmas Carol" (Un chant de Noël, 1920) et Character Sketches from Boz (1924) [ 4 ] .

Il a également illustré les livres pour enfants de Mary Angela Dickens (en) basés sur les romans de son grand-père, Charles Dickens, notamment "Children's Stories from Dickens" (1911) et "Dickens' Dream Children" (1926), ainsi qu'un certain nombre d'histoires se déroulant dans des écoles publiques britanniques fictives, notamment "Boys of the Priory School" (1900) et "The Boys of Wynport School" (1916) [ 5 ] .


Harold Copping - History

Mr. Pecksniff and Old Martin Chuzzlewit

From Character Sketches from Dickens , facing p. 70

The scene illustrated occurs in serial episode four (chapter 10, "Containing Strange Matter on which many events in this history, may, for their own good or evil influence, chiefly depend" (April 1843).

Scanned image, caption, and commentary below by Philip V. Allingham

[You may use this image without prior permission for any scholarly or educational purpose as long as you (1) credit the person who scanned the image and (2) link your document to this URL in a web document or cite the Victorian Web in a print one. .]

In one of his prefaces to Martin Chuzzlewit , Dickens declares that his main object was "to exhibit in a variety of aspects the commonest of all vices to show how selfishness propagates itself and to what a grim giant it may grow, from small beginnings." In the person of Pecksniff he created a character that has become a by-word for hypocrisy, whilst other characters, such as Sairey Gamp and old Martin Chuzzlewit, have taken their place in the gallery of immortals. On the reverse side, equally inimitable, are to be found Tom Pinch, Mark Tapley, Ruth Pinch, John Westlock, and scores of others. The selections made from the book represent these phases. Old Martin is introduced in the first excerpt, delightful Ruth Pinch and her brother in the next, whilst the immortal tea party of Sairey Gamp and Betsy Prig forms the third.

Bibliography

Matz, B. W., and Kate Perugini illustrated by Harold Copping. Character Sketches from Dickens . London: Raphael Tuck, 1924. Copy in the Paterson Library, Lakehead University.


Wilf Copping, one of the original hard men of football

Wilf Copping was born in Yorkshire on 17 August 1909. He attended Houghton Council School and left to become a miner while playing for local teams Dearn Valley, Middlecliffe and Dartfield Rovers (of whom I can find no information.). He tried for a place with second division Barnsley in 1929, but failed to get in. He kept on trying and later in the year he signed for Leeds United of the first division.

In 1929/30 Leeds had a settled team and came fifth, but upon the injury of George Reed at the end of the season Wilf was given a place in the side in a new half back line (all of whom eventually played for England) at the start of the next season. He played every game that season, although that might not be too great a recommendation since the side were relegated.

Wilf continued as a near ever present, in the next season as Leeds got promoted and continued this run back in the first division playing a total of 159 games. He won his first England cap in May 1933 in a 1-1 draw with Italy, and kept his place for six consecutive matches.

Herbert Chapman identified Wilf as the man to replace Bob John in the Arsenal team, and after Herbert’s death George Allison took over the negotiations and brought Wilf to Arsenal in June 1934 for £8000 (about £1.5 million in today’s money).

On 14 November 1934 Wilf played in the Battle of Highbury – the England/Italy match which contained seven Arsenal players. The Italians were world champions, and England (who didn’t enter the world cup) thought that they, England, ought to be. Various players, including Stanley Matthews said that this was the roughest game they had ever played in – and generally blame is laid at the door of the Italians.

But England had its own weapon that day: Wilf Copping. It is suggested that the concept of the fearsome shoulder charge did not exist at that time in Italy, but did in England, and Wilf was the ultimate exponent. He was also an expert at the now illegal two footed tackle. The Italian captain was tackled by Wilf and had to retire with a splintered bone in his foot.

Just as Wilf had been a regular for Leeds so he was a regular for Arsenal until March 1935 when he was injured. Arsenal won the league and Wilf got his first medal. The following season he got a cup winner’s medal, and two seasons later another championship medal. He continued to play for England and played in six more games.

One of these games was against Scotland in April 1938. Bill Shankley complained that within 10 minutes of the start he had had his leg cut by Wilf. In all he won 20 caps for England between 1933 and 1939.

In all Wilf played for Arsenal for four years, winning as we have seen three major trophies plus two charity shields, and making over 35 starts in each season making a total of 189 games before handing in a transfer request to move back to Leeds. It is said that he felt war was inevitable and so wanted to be near his family before he joined the military.

As noted in the previous article Wilf was close friends with Jack Crayston whose on-field personality was almost exactly the opposite of Wilf, and who joined the club at just about the same time as Wilf. However Wilf was also reported to be very volatile in the dressing room, and could suddenly explode with anger, apparently if anyone dared speak to him before a game. In a profession known for its superstitions he was an extreme example, apparently always putting his left boot on first and always insisting on being sixth man out of the dressing room. It seems few would argue with him on such points of detail.

So after almost five years at the top with Arsenal, in March 1939 just before the outbreak of war he predicted, Wilf went back to Yorkshire.

He played in 12 of the last 13 matches of the final pre-war season for Leeds, which helped them to climb to 13th in the table and won his final cap for England as a Leeds player, in the 2-0 defeat of Rumania in May 1939.

Wilf Copping joined the army and served in North Africa, rising to the rank of sergeant major (it is difficult to imagine him having any discipline problems from the ranks). He played 24 wartime game for Leeds, and retired from playing football in 1942.

After the war he became the trainer to the Army team in Dusseldorf, before coaching at Beerschot in Antwerp, and then in the summer of 1946 as football prepared to resume he became trainer at Southend United. He moved to Bristol City in the summer of 1954 and Coventry City from November 1956 to May 1959, at which point aged 50 he retired from football, living out his retirement in Southend where he died in June 1980 at the age of 70.

In 1998 the Football League, as part of its centenary celebrations, included Wilf Copping in the list of 100 League Legends.

The fact that it seems that over 340 League games he wasn’t actually booked or sent off, despite the complaints of others about him, either suggests that he was “hard but fair” or that the refs were incompetent. Certainly Shankley (who claimed that the leg injury he got from Wilf stayed with him all his life and one ankle was always bigger than the other from then on) claimed that Wilf played the man not the ball.

There’s not enough close up camera work for anyone to know. But his looks are recorded – he played with a stubble, had a boxer’s nose and a fierce look. No wonder they made him a sergeant major in the army.

7 comments to Wilf Copping, one of the original hard men of football

In the infamous Arsenal (sorry) England vs Italy game at Highbury in 1934, Eddie Hapgood, the England and Arsenal left back and Captain had his nose broken. At the banquet after the game, the Italian concerned laughed at Eddie’s injury. Eddie said he had to control himself from leaping across the table in retribution.
Two things about Wilf Copping. On matchdays he refrained from shaving in order to look even more fearsome than usual.
And there was one occasion when Arsenal were about to fold in a game when little went right and the players were acting like wimps. As the team were called from the dressingroom for the second half, Wilf stood up and in a loud menacing voice said “Everyone will now get STUCK IN”.

Its a pitty Wilf Copping doesnt play for The Arsenal today,
sounds like,just what we could do with,a good leader.

The nearest to Wilf that I can think of was Peter Storey. Not as good, but a similar fearsome tackler.

Not surprised he served in North Africa. If any part of a war can be called not rough, that theater of operations was quite rough, being a desert and going up against troops commanded by “magnificent bastard” Erwin Rommel. My grandfather was in the U.S. Army Air Corps (forerunner of the USAF) and served under George S. Patton there at the same time. I guess if you can survive mining in Yorkshire like Wilf Copping or sweatshops in Manhattan like my Grandpa, you can face Nazis.

Wilf is also lucky he played in that era, and not today. We may never know what, if anything, the Chapman/Allison era players got away with it, because the press probably protected them. Can you imagine the headline in the Arsenal-hating Sun if he got caught in a compromising position? “WILF, COPPING A FEEL!”

Uncle Mike
I may be naive but I doubt if there was much jiggery pokery in pre-WW2 football, at least not in the top clubs of Div One in England. Firstly, morals had not yet taken a tumble (not until the War). Secondly, at least at Arsenal, there was a very strict code of behaviour ( e.g. one player signing abandoned due to his “unpleasant eating habits”).Finally, there wasn’t the grossly inflated salaries about as there are today. Players were well paid of course, relative to the average wage of the country.

Nice to see you all commenting on the football career of Wilf Copping he was my godfather and I was lucky enough to try on his shirts and England caps a true legend!


Watch the video: Ο ΕΠΙΣΤΑΤΗΣ ΧΑΡΟΛΝΤ ΠΙΝΤΕΡ ΣΚΗΝ ΓΙΩΡΓΟΣ ΚΙΜΟΥΛΗΣ (December 2021).